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I have been working on a tool that uses a BackgroundWorker to perform a ping operation on a regular interval. I am running into an issue with the BackgroundWorker ProgressChanged event. The code for the ProgressChanged Event is below:

private void backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
       {
           ProgressUpdated update = (ProgressUpdated)e.UserState;
           if (sender.ToString() == "System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker")
           {
               toolStripStatusLabel1.Text = update.GeneralStatus;
               toolStripProgressBar1.Value = update.ProgressStatus;
               toolStripStatusLabel2.Text = update.SpecificStatus;
           }
           else
           {
               toolStripStatusLabel1.Text = update.GeneralStatus;
               toolStripProgressBar2.Value = update.ProgressStatus;
               toolStripStatusLabel3.Text = update.SpecificStatus;
           }
       }

The ProgressChanged event gets called both in the BackgroundWork where it updates the first values and from the pingcompletedcallback event when a ping finishes. I only run into the cross threading issue when the ProgressChanged event runs from the PingCompletedCallback event. It throws the error when it goes to update the second Progress bar.

I can not seem to figure out why its happening for one of the calls but not the other.

Is the PingCompletedCallBack happening on the BackgroundWorker thread and thats why its causing the cross threading issues?

If so how do I raise the event so that it will be processed on the UI thread and not the backgroundworker?

Edit:

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
         BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;
         // creates ping and sends it async
         ProgressUpdated args = new ProgressUpdated(string1, int1, string 2);
         worker.ReportProgress(0,args);
         // rest of thread for cleanup when cancellation is called
    }
private void PingCompletedCallback(object sender, PingCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
            // handle the ping response
            ProgressUpdated update = new ProgressUpdated(string1, int1, string2);
            ProgressChangedEventArgs changed = new ProgressChangedEventArgs(1,update);
            backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(this, changed);
            // handle other types of responses

    }

I thought the use of events was to allow the separation of threads. Aka worker thread raises an event that the UI thread is listening for, then the raised event gets processed on the UI thread.

Since my understanding was wrong, would the PingCompletedCallBack have access to the the ReportProgress method of the backgroundworker?

I could then change in PingCompletedCallback:

ProgressChangedEventArgs changed = new ProgressChangedEventArgs(1,update);
backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(this, changed);

to:

backgroundWorker1.ReportProgress(1, update);

or would I need to change it in some other way?

Thanks for anyone's assistance.

Edit 2:

Changed ProgrssChanged event

private void backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
       {
           ProgressUpdated update = (ProgressUpdated)e.UserState;
           toolStripStatusLabel1.Text = update.GeneralStatus;
           toolStripProgressBar1.Value = update.ProgressStatus;
           toolStripStatusLabel2.Text = update.SpecificStatus;
       }

I then created a second update event

private void PingUpdate (object sender, ProgressUpdated e)
    {
         toolStripStatusLabel1.Text = e.GeneralStatus;
         toolStripProgressBar2.Value = e.ProgressStatus;
         toolStripStatusLable3.Text = e.SepcificStatus;
    }

The only thing I have left is to call the new event from PingCompletedCallback in such a way as it gets executed on the UI Thread. Is this where the Invoke statement would be used or should the Invokes be used in the new event?

share|improve this question
    
Side note: it is better to say "sender is BackgroundWorker" than sender.ToString(). Since ProgressChanged executes on UI thread it does not require Invoke. –  Nikola Markovinović Mar 8 '12 at 9:09
    
You shouldn't have to use any kind of invoke in the backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged method. Use ReportProgress to report progress, as this is precisely the goal of these background workers; synchronize background tasks with the GUI. Don't call backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(this, changed) as it will be called from the worker thread. –  Philippe Mar 8 '12 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The documentation for BackgroundWorker states that you should not be manipulating UI objects through the DoWork method, and that any changes to UI objects should be made through ReportProgress. I haven't looked at reflector, but it's probably performing a hidden "Invoke" for you. Whatever is raising your PingCompleted event is probably executing within the worker thread or some other thread that is not the main thread.

You will see in the threads window of the Visual Studio debugger that DoTask does not execute on the main thread; however, when ReportProgress is called, the handler is executed on the main thread. Since your controls were probably created on the main thread, you do not see the exception. enter image description here

Now, if you attempt to call backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged explicitly within the DoWork method, then backgroundWorker1_ProgressedChanged will be executed on the same thread that's executing the DoWork method, or, in your case, the method that's raising the PingCompleted event: enter image description here

You can probably solve this cross thread exception by adding InvokeRequired checks within your backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged handler, or route your PingCompleted handler to call ReportProgress

EDIT:

Calling ReportProgress from the PingCompleted handler won't work because you will lose the original sender.

private void backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{
    if (InvokeRequired)
    {
        Invoke(new ProgressChangedEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged), sender, e);
        return;
    }

    // The rest of your code goes here
}

EDIT 2 Response:

private void PingUpdate (object sender, ProgressUpdated e)
{
     if (InvokeRequired)
     {
        Invoke(new Action<object, ProgressUpdated>(PingUpdate), sender, e);
        return;
     }

     toolStripStatusLabel1.Text = e.GeneralStatus;
     toolStripProgressBar2.Value = e.ProgressStatus;
     toolStripStatusLable3.Text = e.SepcificStatus;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the visuals, I was not aware I could look at the threads in such detail. would the PingCompletedCallBack have access to the backgroundWorker in order to make a call to ReportProgress? –  John Groman Mar 8 '12 at 13:49
    
I just noticed that your handler has two different progress bars, and you use the sender to determine which progress bar to update. If you go with the routing approach, then your sender will always be the background worker. You have at least two options here. Create a separate handler for the ping completed event, and update the UI components there (using Invoke). This will get rid of the nasty if (sender is ...) check. If you are adamant about using one handler, then you will need to add Invoke checks within the progress handler –  Tung Mar 8 '12 at 18:30
    
I think I will separate the update calls, so to remove the awkward if (sender is... ) check. Is it better to perform the Invoke in the update event or when you call the event? See edit 2 –  John Groman Mar 8 '12 at 19:33
    
I hope you understand that this is a personal bias (if(sender is ...), and may not be shared by others. Now that you have posted your PingCompletedCallBack code, I think you can replace all the code in there with the code to update your control (remember to use invoke). Honestly, I do not know which approach is better, but you will not have to define a new handler. –  Tung Mar 8 '12 at 19:43
    
I did realize that it was a person bias. I do not need to call the Invoke for each toolStrip item? Would I be able to use the Invoke in the PingCompletedCallback or should it stay in the PingUpdate event? Thanks for all of your assistance marking your response as answer. –  John Groman Mar 8 '12 at 21:05

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