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I am running a complicated multithread java game, which is working perfectly with the exception of this function. This function, when called, approximately 0.01% of the time, will cause a thread hitch of a quarter of second. Through a series of debug lines and time measurements, it's absolutely down to this function (and three others almost exactly like it).

The usage of this function is to provide the light level of a nearby block within a voxel engine game. It is only run when a section of the world is updated, which can happen alongside rendering.

Please note:

  • This function works accurately 100% of the time for its intended function.
  • This function causes a thread hitch of approximately a quarter second 0.01% of the time.
  • The variables are not synchronized.
  • The function is never called more than once at a time in the program.
  • All variables are valid fields of a larger, non-synchronized class.
  • All variables are integers.
  • The array light[][][] is a byte[][][].
  • This method is never called more than once at a time, as it is synchronized by a larger method on a wide interval.

I'm pretty sure external synchronization is not the issue.

What part(s) of this function may be causing an issue with thread synchronization, CPU overuse, or stack filling, and how can I go about improving performance to get rid of these render hitches?

public byte nsleftlighting(int[] coords){
    if(coords[0]<0)return 16;
    difx=chunkedx-chunks[coords[0]].X;
    difz=chunkedz-chunks[coords[0]].Z;
    if(coords[1]==0){ 
        if(-difx<=-(chunklimit)){return 16;}

        else if (-difx==0) {
            if(-difz>=0){
                proz=0;
                specialz=-difz;
            }else{
                specialz=difz-1;
                proz=1;
            }
            if(chunks[chunkxyid[1][proz][0][specialz]].loaded){
                return chunks[chunkxyid[1][proz][0][specialz]].light[15][coords[2]][coords[3]];
            }
            else{return 16;}
        } else {
            if(-difz>=0){
                proz=0;
                specialz=-difz;
            }else{
                specialz=difz-1;
                proz=1;
            }
            if(-difx>0){
                prox=0;
                specialx=-difx-1;
            }else{
                specialx=difx;
                prox=1;
            }
            if(chunks[chunkxyid[prox][proz][specialx][specialz]].loaded){
                return chunks[chunkxyid[prox][proz][specialx][specialz]].light[15][coords[2]][coords[3]];
            } else {return 16;}
        }
    }
    if(coords[1]>0){
        return chunks[coords[0]].light[coords[1]-1][coords[2]][coords[3]];
    }
    return 16;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't see anything in here that would cause a performance problem -- at least not with that high a variance. Array accesses should be extremely fast -- even if they are 4 dimensional arrays. [[Nice effort on that.]]

A quarter second is not a huge amount of time which makes me wonder if the profiler is lying to you about the source of the problem. It may be responding poorly to the multi-dimensional arrays or some other attribute of this method that is not immediately apparent -- to me at least.

One possibility, however remote, is that your program is swapped and these arrays are pretty big. If they aren't accessed very often is there any chance you are seeing some IO as some memory pages are swapped in?

You commented that you are using wall-clock timers to determine that the routine takes 250ms. Are you sure that the CPU was actually executing that method for that time period? Could this be a thread contention issue that is taking over CPU in some other part of the program? Can you see if you see CPU spikes every so often when this method takes a long time?

Any chance you are seeing a GC heap lock and it's affecting the array accesses more than other routines? Can you watch the memory graphs to see if you see a correlation? Does giving the program more heap affect the timing or the frequency of the problem? This is going to be more an issue if you are running Java <= 1.5.

share|improve this answer
    
The major container class retains a reference to the arrays, so I'm relatively certain they aren't being unloaded. The only large array used in this function is light[16][200][16]. For profiling, I ran timers before functions and read them afterwards to get the total time taken. I narrowed it down within function nests to this particular method, it is absolutely this. At one point, I used a substitute method which fixed the hitches but did not provide the data detail I need. –  Sean Mar 8 '12 at 6:02
    
@Sean I've edited my answer to address the wall-clock timer issue. Yeah, light is not a large enough array to make a difference. That's only like ~50k. Any chance you are seeing a GC heap lock and it's affecting the array accesses more than other routines? Can you watch the memory graphs to see if you see a correlation? –  Gray Mar 8 '12 at 6:11
1  
I'm certain that it's within this thread, because I went and timed several other sub-methods, and they never cause any hitch. I also timed all the other thread functions running at the same time. I'm extremely certain this has nothing to do with the GC, as I have eliminated all memory leaks from my program and I re-use nearly all of my variables as fields. Memory usage stays exactly the same once the game is running. However, if you still think this may be the case, I'd like a suggestion for which profiler to use. I am using JDK-1.6. I've given the program 30% more heap space than it requires. –  Sean Mar 8 '12 at 6:16
    
I've edited some more details into the above comment. –  Sean Mar 8 '12 at 6:19
1  
@Sean Good job. The only thing I have left is that it's not about memory leaks but about memory bandwidth. I would recommend trying to increase memory to see if it changes the frequency of the issue although it does seem to be grasping at straws. I don't have a profiler to recommend YourKit is popular but I don't have a lot of experience with it. –  Gray Mar 8 '12 at 6:24

Multidimensional arrays in Java are not guaranteed to be laid out in the memory contiguously (I'm not sure if 1-dimensional arrays are specifically guaranteed to be contiguous either, but in practice they are). Therefore, depending on how you access the elements, the CPU cache might have to be updated quite often (as opposed to accessing successive or nearby elements in an 1-dimensional array, which is quite fast, as the whole array, or at least a contiguous block of it, can be loaded to cache at once; additionally, newer JVM implementations can optimize index bound checks away in some simple - but not complex - cases (loops) which makes array access almost as fast as it can be in any language (C)). What exactly happens depends on the JVM implementation and the memory manager. See this for a reference.

So, using multidimensional arrays as opposed to manually mapped 1-dimensional arrays is generally a performance penalty, but would hardly account for quarter-second delays in this case. If the arrays are really big, could it be swapping to disk cache?

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I've set my java heap space to a large, but conservative amount which should be more than enough to keep all my arrays in the memory. At any given point the maximum memory used by all the light[][][] arrays will not exceed 21MB. Other arrays in my program are much large, but still easily within the java heap space, and are accessed equally often using a simpler version of this function, that does not cause hitches. Basically, this is the only function doing it, but others work extremely similarly. –  Sean Mar 8 '12 at 6:07
1  
Agreed. I'd try replacing the multidimensional array with an array that's manually mapped as a test. "[chunkxyid[prox][proz][specialx][specialz]].light[15][coords[2]][coords[3]]" has the potential to be very expensive when it comes to the CPU cache. –  David Ehrmann Mar 8 '12 at 6:08
    
Do you mean to replace light [16][200][16] with light [51200]? The array has all the values to set 0 through a loop prior to the calculations. chunkxyid is only 2x2x10x10. –  Sean Mar 8 '12 at 6:12

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