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Possible Duplicate:
C# Captured Variable In Loop

I am pretty new to multi-threading programming. When I ran the code below and only the last child got executed. Can some one tell me what happened? Thank you very much.

private void Process()
{
    Dictionary<int, int> dataDict = new Dictionary<int, int>();
    dataDict.Add(1, 2000);
    dataDict.Add(2, 1000);
    dataDict.Add(3, 4000);
    dataDict.Add(4, 3000);

    foreach (KeyValuePair<int, int> kvp in dataDict)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Ready for [" + kvp.Key.ToString() + "]");
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomething(kvp.Value, kvp.Key));
    }

private static void DoSomething(int waitTime, int childID)
{
    {               
        Console.WriteLine("Start task [" + childID.ToString() + "]");
        Thread.Sleep(waitTime);
        Console.WriteLine("End task [" + childID.ToString() + "]");
    }
}

Output


Ready for [1]
Ready for [2]
Ready for [3]
Ready for [4]
Start task [4]
Start task [4]
Start task [4]
Start task [4]
End task [4]
End task [4]
End task [4]
End task [4]
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Christian.K, meandmycode, Cody Gray, Hans Olsson, Graviton Mar 9 '12 at 1:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Ya, console app. – Dreteh Mar 8 '12 at 7:23
up vote 12 down vote accepted

By using the loop variable in your lambda, all of the effectively refer to the same variable, which is the last item of your dictionary at the time they run.

You need to assign the loop variable to another variable local to the loop before passing it to a lambda. Do this:

foreach (KeyValuePair<int, int> kvp in dataDict)
{
    var pair = kvp;
    Console.WriteLine("Ready for [" + pair.Key.ToString() + "]");
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSomething(pair.Value, pair.Key));
}

EDIT: It seems this little pitfall is fixed in C#5. That's why it might work for others ;) See comment by labroo

share|improve this answer
2  
people should really explain why they downvoted, seems like a reasonable explanation to me – Nadir Muzaffar Mar 8 '12 at 7:18
2  
Why the downvote, I dont know if this is the solution, but it is a valid change....... blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/12/… – labroo Mar 8 '12 at 7:20
    
Was wondering, too. Can't see anything wrong with my answer. – Botz3000 Mar 8 '12 at 7:20
    
btw, what Botz3000's answer is implying is that all of the threads run...however, by the time they get the chance to run, kvp == 4 – Nadir Muzaffar Mar 8 '12 at 7:23
    
Thanks for replying. – Dreteh Mar 8 '12 at 7:23

You can prevent that behavior by assigning kvp to a local variable in the for loop and pass the variables fields Key and Value to the DoSomething method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I figured that too, but I just don't understand why. – Dreteh Mar 8 '12 at 7:24

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