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I'm trying to build an XML file that reads the content to put inside from a list:

List<Snack> trashFoods

When I create the XML file, it would be something like this:

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment(""),
    new XElement("Snacks",
    trashFoods.Select(snack =>
        new XElement("Type", snack.Type),
        new XElement("Name", snack.Name)
    ),
)

What I want to, and I am unable to do is something like putting conditionals inside the construction of the XML file. Similar to this:

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment(""),
    new XElement("Snacks",
    trashFoods.Select(snack =>
        new XElement("Type", snack.Type),
        if(snack.Type == "Doritos")
        {
            new XElement("GotSauce", snack.Sauce),
        }
        new XElement("Name", snack.Name)
    ),
)

Is this such a thing even possible with LINQ to XML even if the syntax is not the same?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

LINQ to XML objects are not immutable, so you can rewrite your declarative code into imperative one using Add():

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment("")
);

XElement snacks = new XElement("Snacks");

foreach (var snack in trashFoods)
{
    snacks.Add(new XElement("Type", snack.Type));

    if(snack.Type == "Doritos")
        snacks.Add(new XElement("GotSauce", snack.Sauce));

    snacks.Add(new XElement("Name", snack.Name));
}

doc.Add(snacks);

It's not very pretty, but it work. Another approach would be to extract the conditional code into a method using yield return:

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment(""),
    new XElement("Snacks",
        trashFoods.Select(snack => GetSnackChildren(snack))));

…

IEnumerable<XElement> GetSnackChildren(Snack snack)
{
    yield return new XElement("Type", snack.Type);
    if(snack.Type == "Doritos")
    {
        yield return new XElement("GotSauce", snack.Sauce);
    }
    yield return new XElement("Name", snack.Name);
}

This looks better, but it splits code that probably should be together.

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Thanks! Will try the yield approach as fits better with my code - and also will help me to learn the keyword, which is new to me. –  Ed. Mar 8 '12 at 8:28
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You could try this (which will always have a GotSauce element):

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment(""),
    new XElement("Snacks",
        trashFoods.Select(snack =>
            new XElement("Snack",
                new XElement("Type", snack.Type),
                new XElement("Name", snack.Name),
                new XElement("GotSauce", snack.Type=="Doritos" ? snack.Sauce : "")
            )
        )
));

or this (which won't)

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment(""),
    new XElement("Snacks",
        trashFoods.Select(snack =>
            snack.Type=="Doritos" ? 
                new XElement("Snack",
                    new XElement("Type", snack.Type),
                    new XElement("Name", snack.Name),
                    new XElement("GotSauce", snack.Sauce)) :
                new XElement("Snack",
                    new XElement("Type", snack.Type),
                    new XElement("Name", snack.Name))                   
            )
        )
    );

or this (which doesn't either)

XDocument doc = new XDocument(
    new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes"),
    new XComment(""),
    new XElement("Snacks",
        trashFoods.Select(snack =>
            new XElement("Snack",
                new XElement("Type", snack.Type),
                new XElement("Name", snack.Name),
                snack.Type=="Doritos" ? new XElement("GotSauce", snack.Sauce) : null
            )
        )
));
share|improve this answer
    
That's not the same. This will always create a 'GotSauce'-XElement. –  Dominic Kexel Mar 8 '12 at 8:48
    
Is that better? –  Phil Mar 8 '12 at 9:03
    
Thanks, this was useful too :) Finally the solution was using a combination of both ways, as the real problem was quite a bit more complicated that what I was trying to explain. –  Ed. Mar 8 '12 at 10:41
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