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I have an htaccess file with a simple rewrite rule.

RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^([a-zA-Z0-9]+)/?$ index.php?page=$1

On my web server, the index.php file is in /var/www, and it works normally.

On my local host, the index.php fle is in /var/www/projects/porto and while the file runs normally, no linked content ( images, css, etc ) is loaded.

I am totally new to htaccess files. Any ideas on how to work around it so I can do my testing in my locan environment?

All I've tried is changing my .htaccess file to

RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^([a-zA-Z0-9]+)/?$ /running/Porto/index.php?page=$1

But no luck.

share|improve this question
    
Could this be a relativity issue - meaning the browser is expecting the "linked content" to be located somewhere it is not? Check the source and confirm that the rendered page shows correct paths/urls for those files. .. I am not seeing a big issue with your RewriteRule. The regex should not apply to anything with a dot in it. –  ghbarratt Mar 8 '12 at 8:52
    
No. It does not. When I click on this for example: <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/views/style.css" />, it takes me to /views/style.css, not to running/porto/views/style.css –  AnPel Mar 8 '12 at 8:55
    
Okay, so you have site-relative paths (which is usually a good thing). What you probably need to do then is configure your local environment to work like the server and either set running/Porto/ as a virtual host document root, or just (temporarily) set it as THE root for your local web server (assuming Apache). You could also alter all the paths to not be site-relative (remove the beginning slashes). –  ghbarratt Mar 8 '12 at 8:58
    
It is apache, I use LAMP. Yes, the question is how to set running/Porto/ as a virtual host document root for this folder and it's subfolders. –  AnPel Mar 8 '12 at 9:02
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, so continuing our discussion on setting up a VirtualHost on your local machine/environment, it is roughly the same as on your other server. If you can copy the Apache configuration file from the web server then that will be a good start. At a minimum you will need something like this:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName localdevsite.com
    DocumentRoot /var/www/running/Proto
</VirtualHost>

(This assumes that somewhere in the file you have NameVirtualHost *:80)

The one additional thing you will need to do in your local environment is add a hosts entry:

In Linux you usually do this in /etc/hosts with something like:

127.0.0.1 localdevsite.com 
share|improve this answer
    
Sadly copying is not an option. I just bought a hosting service and everything was set up. I called them just in case but they cannot provide the file. I found my local VirtualHost settings in /etc/apache2/sites-available/default. I changed the DocumentRoot to /var/www/running/Porto, I restarted apache, and everything wokrs fine. The problem is that folder "running" contains all my active projects, and the way I have set things up, I only have access to Porto. Is there a way to make it more specific, go around it, whatever? –  AnPel Mar 8 '12 at 9:38
    
Well if you set up one VirtualHost to go to /var/www/running/Proto there is still nothing to prevent you from setting up another VirtualHost that goes to /var/www/running, and with that one you could perhaps turn on the Indexes. You can also make a VirtualHost for ever other project you have. You could set them all up as separate domains in your /etc/hosts or you could set them up as subdomains of the same locally routed domain. It's your own local environment, so you are at more liberty to make it work however you want. –  ghbarratt Mar 8 '12 at 9:46
    
Understood exactly 0 of above points. Doing my reading and getting back. –  AnPel Mar 8 '12 at 9:48
    
Took me a while but I finally got it. Pretty cool actually. Thank you so much for your time, wish I could upvote more than once. –  AnPel Mar 8 '12 at 10:16
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