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I have a wrapper class to an int, named intWrapper, and a function addN that adds two numbers, defined as follows:

intWrapper* addN(intWrapper *first, intWrapper *second)
{
    intWrapper c;
    c.setData(first->getData() + second->getData());
    return &c;
}

Then, in the main() function I do this:

intWrapper first(20), second(40);
intWrapper* t = addN(&first, &second);
cout << (*t).getData() << endl;

In Dev-c++(MingW32) this executes as intended, and will print the value 60, but in Visual C++ I get the value -858993460.
However, if I use the new keyword to create a new object inside the addN function it outputs 60 also in Visual C++. I am intrigued as to why this happens. Any thoughts?
Full code is here:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<typename T, T defaultValue>
class Wrapper
{
      private: T n_;
      public:
             Wrapper(T n = defaultValue) : n_(n) {}
             T getData()
             {
                  return n_;
             }
             void setData(T n)
             {
                  n_ = n;
             }
};

typedef Wrapper<int, 47> intWrapper;

intWrapper* addN(intWrapper *first, intWrapper *second)
{
   intWrapper c;
   c.setData(first->getData() + second->getData());
   return &c;
}

int main()
{
    intWrapper p;
    cout << p.getData() << endl;
    intWrapper first(20), second(40);
    intWrapper* t = addN(&first, &second);
    cout << (*t).getData() << endl;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 1;
}
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Also note that VC++ likes to fill every piece of possibly "bad memory" with values like 0xbaadf00d, 0xcccccccc, 0xffffffff. In your case you've got the value 0xFFFFFFFFCCCCCCCC, which looks like the program swallowed some vomit. –  ActiveTrayPrntrTagDataStrDrvr Mar 8 '12 at 9:59
    
You should get used to enabling high warning levels... –  PlasmaHH Mar 8 '12 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

This is undefined behaviour: you are returning a pointer to a local variable which will be destructed when the function returns meaning the return value is a dangling pointer.

Undefined behaviour means anything can happen: it may crash, it may appear to "work" correctly or may not work correctly.

When you use new the intWrapper instance will exist beyond the scope of the function and is not undefined behaviour and will work correctly (for both VC and MingW32). Remember to delete the returned intWrapper* when no longer required.

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Ah, I see, it's pretty obvious really, stupid me. Thank you. –  hero47 Mar 8 '12 at 9:58
2  
@hero47 If this answer was a (or the best) solution to your problem, then accepting it would be the correct response. –  Christian Rau Mar 8 '12 at 10:21

In Dev-c++(MingW32) this executes as intended

It does not execute as intended. The program uses undefined behavior. Anything can happen when you do that.

You return pointer to local variable. Local variable ceases to exist when you return from function. Which means that memory previously used by that variable could contain anything or might not even be readable anymore (i.e. you'll get segfault/access violation). Unless you like playing russian roulette and want completely unpredictable behavior in your program, you shouldn't do that.

Either return IntWrapper by value (you need copy constructor and assignment operator for that):

intWrapper addN(intWrapper *first, intWrapper *second)
{
    intWrapper c;
    c.setData(first->getData() + second->getData());
    return c;
}

, or allocate it with new and then return the result (and forget to delete it later)

intWrapper* addN(intWrapper *first, intWrapper *second)
{
    intWrapper *c = new intWrapper;
    c->setData(first->getData() + second->getData());
    return c;
}

Or use smart pointer (shared_ptr) to delete it automatically.

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