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     I have the following code:


        try
        {
            FileStream FS = new FileStream(this.InFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
            return "";
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException ex)
        {
            return ex.Message;
        }

        finally
        {
            FS.Close();
            FS.Dispose();
        }

but when I compile it I get an error saying that: the name 'FS' doesn't exist in the current context.

so I put a FileStream declaration at the top before the try ..catch block like this

        FileStream FS;
        try
        {
            FileStream FS = new FileStream(this.InFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
            return "";
        }
        catch (FileNotFoundException ex)
        {
            return ex.Message;
        }

        finally
        {
            FS.Close();
            FS.Dispose();
        }

but when I compile I get an error saying use of unassigned variable FS and it points to the finally block.

now I understand both errors and why I am getting them but I don't know how to code it so that I try the code and catch the errors if there are any.

any help would be appreciated - thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What would happen if a FileNotFoundException were thrown? Then you'd get to the finally clause (FS.Close() and FS.Dispose()) but FS wasn't initialized! What you should do is initialize FS to null and in the finally clause add an if statement checking the FS is not null

    FileStream FS = null;
    try
    {
        FS = new FileStream(this.InFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
        return "";
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException ex)
    {
        return ex.Message;
    }

    finally
    {
        if (FS != null) {
            FS.Close();
            FS.Dispose();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

FS is declared in the scope of the try block, so it doesn't exist outside that block.

The correct code is:

    FileStream FS = null;
    try
    {
        FS = new FileStream(this.InFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
        return "";
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException ex)
    {
        return ex.Message;
    }

    finally
    {
        if (FS != null)
        {
          FS.Close();
          FS.Dispose();
        }
    }

This code is not optimal (refer to Marc's answer for the optimal solution). This code is simply an example of why the original code didn't compile (without changing the structure of the original code)

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't compile, and that fact has even been mentioned in the original post. –  Ch00k Jun 7 '09 at 9:57
    
This code is different from the code in the question. It's true that it doesn't compile, but for a different reason: because the FS object is not initialized to null. I'll fix the code, but Marc's answer is the only correct one. –  Philippe Leybaert Jun 7 '09 at 10:18

The other replies have covered why (scoping and definite assignment) - but you are making life hard...

try {
    using(FileStream FS = new FileStream(
        this.InFile, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        return "";
    }
} catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
    return ex.Message;
}
share|improve this answer

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