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Possible Duplicate:
Is destructor called if SIGINT or SIGSTP issued?

My code like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <signal.h>
#include <cstdlib>

void handler(int) {
    std::cout << "will exit..." << std::endl;
    exit(0);
}

class A {
public:
    A() {std::cout << "constructor" << std::endl;}
    ~A() {std::cout << "destructor" << std::endl;}
};

int main(void) {
    signal(SIGINT, &handler);

    A a;
    for (;;);

    return 0;
}

When I pressed Ctrl-C, it printed:

constructor
^Cwill exit...

There is no "destructor" printed. So, how can I exit cleanly?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Christian.K, Christian Rau, Bo Persson, Andrew Marshall, Graviton Mar 9 '12 at 1:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Note that the "correct" answer is not as "trivial" as some responses below suggest. For example, you should consider using sigaction intead of signal. Also, the main reason for not using exit() in an async signal handler is that it is simply not supported. Likewise for using iostreams in the signal handler (I'm not 100% sure about that though). Then, using a plain bool instead of volatile std::sig_atomic_t may not be reliable or cause undefined behavior. – Christian.K Mar 8 '12 at 10:13
    
ppst.me/5cUMeA wrote this little hack for you, I find this much cleaner than using a global variable to keep track of the execution flow. – Filip Roséen - refp Mar 8 '12 at 10:26
1  
@refp Problem is, it exhibits undefined behavior all over. – Christian.K Mar 8 '12 at 10:50
    
@Christian.K current implementation, yes. if you move the call to signal to after the calls to handler (with two arguments) it's not undefined behavior. I was a bit quick when writing it, and thought of the above myself but had a meeting to attend. – Filip Roséen - refp Mar 8 '12 at 10:53
    
If you can afford to go platform specific, have a look at gccs -fnon-call-exceptions – PlasmaHH Mar 8 '12 at 10:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

With difficulty. Already, the code you've written has undefined behavior; you're not allowed to output to a stream in a signal handler; for that matter, you're not allowed to call exit either. (I'm basing my assertions here on the Posix standard. In pure C++, all you're allowed to do is assign to a variable of sig_atomic_t type.)

In a simple case like your code, you could do something like:

sig_atomic_t stopFlag = 0;

void
handler( int )
{
    stopFlag = 1;
}

int
main()
{
    signal( SIGINT, &handler );
    A a;
    while ( stopFlag == 0 ) {
    }
    std::cout << "will exit..." << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Depending on the application, you may be able to do something like this, checking the stopFlag at appropriate places. But generally, if you try this, there will be race conditions: you check stopFlag before starting an interuptable system call, then do the call; the signal arrives between the check and the call, you do the call, and it isn't interrupted. (I've used this technique, but in an application where the only interruptable system call was a socket read with a very short timeout.)

Typically, at least under Posix, you'll end up having to create a signal handling thread; this can then be used to cleanly shut down all of the other threads. Basically, you start by setting the signal mask to block all signals, then in the signal handling thread, once started, set it to accept the signals you're interested in and call sigwait(). This implies, however, that you do all of the usual actions necessary for a clean shutdown of the threads: the signal handling thread has to know about all other threads, call pthread_cancel on them, etc., and you're compiler has to generate the correct code to handle pthread_cancel, or you need to develop some other means of ensuring that all threads are correctly notified. (One would hope, today, that all compilers handle pthread_cancel correctly. But one never knows; doing so has significant runtime cost, and is not usually needed.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Finally! :-) – Christian.K Mar 8 '12 at 10:33
    
Thanks in particular for the final paragraph. I've been doing that for a while, and it's nice to see more evidence that other people agree it's a good thing to do. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 10:52
    
I don't get your point about race conditions. The question only wants to use the interrupt to stop the program; the interrupt handler can set the stopFlag and nobody every clears it. You can test the flag at your convenience anywhere (which is outside any system calls of course). Your interrupt may than happen during, or just before, a system call but the handler just sets the flag; the system call will complete and at the next test occasion the flag is found set and shut down starts. You may loose a fraction of a µs, but nothing serious. The main problem is ensuring regular tests are done. – Marc van Leeuwen Apr 20 '15 at 14:21
    
Maybe race conditions isn't the correct word for this scenario, but the problem is clear: a thread may be in a long blocking system call (read on a socket or pipe to which no one writes, for example). A signal will interrupt this, but there is a window between when the flag is tested, and when the system call occurs, in which the thread can block. – James Kanze May 1 '15 at 8:30

You need to exit from the main function's scope to have the destructor working:

#include <iostream>
#include <signal.h>
#include <cstdlib>

bool stop = false;
void handler(int) {
    std::cout << "will exit..." << std::endl;
    stop = true;
}

class A {
public:
    A() {std::cout << "constructor" << std::endl;}
    ~A() {std::cout << "destructor" << std::endl;}
};

int main(void) {
  A a;
  signal(SIGINT, &handler);

  for (;!stop;);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

It's because the context of the normal code and the signal handler is different. If you put the variable a in global scope (i.e. outside of any function) you will see that the destructor is called properly.

If you want to handle cleaning up yourself (instead of letting the run-time and OS handle it), you can have a conditional loop, something like this:

bool keep_running = true;

void handler(int) {
    std::cout << "will exit..." << std::endl;
    keep_running = false;
}

int main(void) {
    signal(SIGINT, &handler);

    A a;
    while (keep_running);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Or you might. Calling exit from a signal handler is undefined behavior, at least according to C90 and Posix, so anything might (and in practice does) happen. – James Kanze Mar 8 '12 at 10:27

Memory should be freed anyway. but if you've got code to be handled, I guess you'd have to track all your objects and then destroy them as needed (e.g. having the constructor adding them to a std::set, while the destructor removes them again). However this wouldn't ensure proper order of destruction (which might require some more complex solution).

You could as well use your signal handler to set some flag that will leave the infinite loop (or whatever you're doing in your main loop) instead of simply terminating using exit().

share|improve this answer
2  
With regards to the first solution: you can't access a global std::set in a signal handler without incurring undefined behavior. (You can't do much of anything in a signal handler without incurring undefined behavior. His current code has undefined behavior.) – James Kanze Mar 8 '12 at 10:29
    
Hm, yeah, you're right. So would in any case require some flag to be set only to leave the loop and/or cause additional handling. – Mario Mar 8 '12 at 11:11
    
About all you can legally do in a signal handler is set a flag or effectively abort the program, without flushing IO buffers, etc. (_exit() or abort()). So unless you want to abort, you have to set a flag. Or handle the signals in a separate thread (at least under Unix). – James Kanze Mar 8 '12 at 11:46
    
Yeah, I remember interupt handling in Assembler back at uni, tnx. :) – Mario Mar 8 '12 at 11:56

exit terminates the process almost immediately; in particular, objects with automatic storage duration are not destroyed. Streams are also flushed and closed, but you're not allowed to touch streams from inside a signal handler. So...

Simply don't call exit from a signal handler; set some atomic flag to instruct the loop to end instead.

#include <iostream>
#include <signal.h>
#include <cstdlib>

sig_atomic_t exitRequested = 0;

void handler(int) {
    std::cout << "will exit..." << std::endl;
    exitRequested = 1;
}

struct A {
     A() { std::cout << "constructor" << std::endl; }
    ~A() { std::cout << "destructor" << std::endl; }
};

int main() {
    signal(SIGINT, &handler);

    A a;
    for (; !exitRequested; );
}
share|improve this answer
    
excellent typo. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 10:24
    
Nitpicker-Alert :-) Well, technically exit does not exit the process immediately - depending on your definition of "immediate" of course. Especially for C++ it does run the destructors for static objects (sorry I have no ref. to the standard for that). All of which is contributing to the reason why exit is not considered async-signal-safe and only _exit() is, which does nothing of the before mentioned. – Christian.K Mar 8 '12 at 10:28
1  
@Christian.K It's not nitpicking. There are very few things you can legally do in a signal handler, because of its asynchronous nature. Under Posix, for example, you can do a system level write, but not anything with FILE* or an iostream. And exit() is forbidden, because it will do things with FILE* and iostream (flush any output, for example). – James Kanze Mar 8 '12 at 10:38
    
@JamesKanze Oh yes, absolutely. Hence, my comment to the original question :-) I used the term "nitpicking", because the answer abolished the use of exit anyway (if for other reasons). – Christian.K Mar 8 '12 at 10:48
1  
Ah thanks :-) there is even a related question on SO already - go figure :-) – Christian.K Mar 8 '12 at 10:54

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