Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a number of tasks which can be carried out by similar (yet slightly different) classes which all share a common set of functionality.

My intention is to extract this functionality into a parent class, and because I don't want this to be implemented itself I've marked it abstract.

However all of the calling classes call a single method - which used to contain the extracted common functionality. I don't want to override the parent class method but I want it to be executed in addition to what is defined in the child class.

I initially thought this was a job for a partial method, but I think this will break semantics somewhat. So what is the best way forward for me? Experiencing a bit of tunnel vision here.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, could you clarify this a bit " I don't want to ovveride the parent class method but I want it to be executed in addition to what is defined in the child class."? Where is your functionality defined in the child class? –  Paddy Mar 8 '12 at 10:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could do it like this:

public abstract class Parent
{
    public void TheSingleMethod()
    {
        CommonFunctionality();

        InternalDo();
    }

    protected abstract void InternalDo();

    private void CommonFunctionality()
    {
        // Common functionality goes here.
    }
}

public class Derived : Parent
{
    protected override void InternalDo()
    {
        // Additional code of child goes here.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just call base.InternalDo() in the overridden method? –  Baboon Mar 8 '12 at 10:16
    
The reason is that you can't enforce it. If you want to enforce that the common functionality is executed for ALL derived classes, the way I showed is the way to go. If it is optional, your suggestion would be the way to go. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 8 '12 at 10:18
    
Ah, I understand his need better now. Good point! –  Baboon Mar 8 '12 at 10:21
    
I went with this one - thanks! –  m.edmondson Mar 8 '12 at 11:03
1  
@m.edmondson: Yes, a very simple template, but it is the template method pattern. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 7 at 9:26

Sounds like you need a Template method

For example

abstract class BaseClass {
    public void Common Method() {
        // Common tasks

        // Call template method
        this.SubclassSpecificMethod();

        // Can also do more code after the call to the template method
    }

    protected abstract void SubclassSpecificMethod();
}
share|improve this answer

Sounds like composition and the Decorator pattern could be another option for you.

share|improve this answer

you can also do:

abstract class BaseClass
{
    public void Method() {
        // Common tasks
    }
}

class RealClass : BaseClass 
{
    public void Method() {
         base.Method();
         // custom tasks for this class
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This method wouldn't enforce that the common functionality is executed for all children. See the comment on my answer for a little bit more info. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 8 '12 at 10:25
    
I know, but author didn't requested that. My method gives more flexibility. Depending on needs of author, one or other is the way to go. –  Deadeye Mar 8 '12 at 10:52
    
Yes, he requested it: "I don't want to override the parent class method but I want it to be executed in addition to what is defined in the child class" –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 8 '12 at 11:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.