Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to convert an integer to a string in Python. I am typecasting it in vain:

t=raw_input()
c=[]
for j in range(0,int(t)):
    n=raw_input()
    a=[]
    a,b= (int(i) for i in n.split(' '))
    d=pow(a,b)
    d.str()
    c.append(d[0])
for j in c:
    print j

When I try to convert it to string, it's showing an error like int doesn't have any attribute called str.

share|improve this question
1  
So, did you try d2=str(d) c.append(d2[0]) is that what you want? – nik Jun 7 '09 at 10:43
8  
use str(d) for getting string form of an integer. – Arnab Ghosal Jan 13 '12 at 11:04
1  
    
I don't even understand the question, are you trying something like ascii-char value for each character in the string? – viridis May 17 '13 at 10:35
up vote 795 down vote accepted
>>> str(10)
'10'
>>> int('10')
10

[Edit]

Links to the documentation:
int()
str()

[Edit]

The problem seems to come from this line: d.str()
Conversion to string is done with the builtin str() function, which basically calls the __str__() method of its parameter.

Also, it shouldn't be necessary to call pow(). Try using the ** operator.

share|improve this answer
4  
why does str(012) return '10' ? – Aryaveer Mar 25 '14 at 19:50
20  
@Aryaveer: because 0 is the prefix for octal representation in Python 2, like 0x is for hexadecimal (it's “0o” for octal in Python 3). So for str(), passing 012 is the same as passing 10. – Bastien Léonard Mar 26 '14 at 14:12
19  
@Aryaveer did you hear the joke "Why do computer programmers confuse Halloween with Christmas?" Because Oct 31 = Dec 25. In C and many other languages a number start with 0 is also an octal number – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Jun 4 '14 at 10:44

Try this:

str(i)
share|improve this answer

There is not typecast and no type coercion in Python. You have to convert your variable in a explicit way.

To convert an object in string you use the str() function. It works with any object that has a method called __str__() defined. In fact

str(a)

is equivalent to

a.__str__()

The same is if you want to convert something to int, float etc.

share|improve this answer
a=2

you can use str(a) which gives you a string object of int(2)

share|improve this answer
    
Why has this got up votes? It's just copied the original answer 4 years before! – Rambatino Nov 26 '15 at 7:54

To manage non-integer inputs:

number = raw_input()
try:
    value = int(number)
except ValueError:
    value = 0

Ok, if I take your latest code and rewrite a bit to get it working with Python:

t=raw_input()
c=[]
for j in range(0,int(t)):
    n=raw_input()
    a=[]
    a,b= (int(i) for i in n.split(' '))
    d=pow(a,b)
    d2=str(d)
    c.append(d2[0])
for j in c:
    print j

It gives me something like:

>>> 2
>>> 8 2
>>> 2 3
6
8

Which is the first characters of the string result pow(a,b). What are we trying to do here?

share|improve this answer
>>> i = 5
>>> s = str(5)
>>> print "Hello, world the number is " + s
Hello, world the number is 5
share|improve this answer

The most decent way in my opinion is ``.

i = 32   -->    `i` == '32'
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that this is equivalent to repr(i), so it will be weird for longs. (Try i = `2 ** 32`; print i) – user4237459 May 19 '15 at 15:46
1  
This has been deprecated in python 2 and completely removed in python 3, so I wouldn't suggest using it anymore. docs.python.org/3.0/whatsnew/3.0.html#removed-syntax – teeks99 Jul 13 '15 at 18:47

protected by Aniket Thakur Apr 5 '15 at 18:15

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.