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I have an array of n number of items

var arr1 = [2, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 2, 2, 0, 0, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 0, 2, 2, 0, 2, 2, 0, 2, 0, 0, 1, 2, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 1, 2, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 1, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1]

as you see the array only has i different values (v) (0,1,2),i = 3 in that case

What I would like is ending up with an array like this one.

var arr2 = [23, 45, 64]

the length of the arr2 array should corresponds to i and the values sould be the occurences of each value(v)

I am doing all kinds of loops and conditionals, but looking for a straight solution. my part so far http://jsfiddle.net/fiddlebjoern/aSsjy/2/

jQuery and/or underscore may be involved.

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see also stackoverflow.com/questions/5667888/… –  georg Mar 8 '12 at 12:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Easy peasy! The values of your input become the keys of your output; you accumulate on those keys as you encounter the values:

var arr1 = [0,0,0,1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,4,3,5];
var arr2 = [];

for (var i = 0; i < arr1.length; i++) {
   var n = arr1[i];
   if (arr2[n] != undefined)
       arr2[n]++;
   else
       arr2[n] = 1;
}

console.log(arr2);  // Output: [3, 1, 2, 5, 3, 1]

Live demo.

share|improve this answer
1  
really easy peasy! +1 :) –  Juvanis Mar 8 '12 at 11:34
    
Close, but no cigar. The members of the array must be initialised as numbers (zero would be best). What you have returns [,NaN,NaN,NaN,NaN,NaN]. –  RobG Mar 8 '12 at 11:35
    
@RobG: I did. And, no, it doesn't. Did you click on the link labelled "demo"? Or even read the code? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 11:36
    
No, I pasted your original posted code into a browser. You've changed it so it works. –  RobG Mar 8 '12 at 11:52
    
really good ... i didnt mention it, but there could also be a string in the initial array. –  Hans Mar 8 '12 at 11:53

Sounds like a job for "reduce"

arr2 = arr1.reduce(function(a, v) {
    a[v] = (a[v] || 0) + 1;
    return a;
}, [])

Also, your arr2 is actually associative, so it's better to use an object instead:

map = arr1.reduce(function(a, v) {
    a[v] = (a[v] || 0) + 1;
    return a;
}, {})

reduce is Javascript 1.8, for older browsers you need an emulation or use a library like underscore.js.

Example with underscore.js:

arr2 = _(arr1).chain().groupBy(_.identity).map(_.size).value()

This is perhaps not so "easy" as other answers, but at least you can learn something from this.

For the sake of being complete, here's the correct way to use a plain loop for the same task:

counter = [] // or {}
for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
     counter[arr[i]] = (counter[arr[i]] || 0) + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
His code explicitly states he wants an array, not a normal object. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 11:35
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit—which is likely why an answer with an array was given first, but an object suggested as a possibly more suitable option. –  RobG Mar 8 '12 at 11:56
    
@RobG: It's given as part of a logical inference ("so") predicated on "your arr2 is actually associative", which makes little sense when an explicit requirement was that it should no longer be. Still, apparently the question has since changed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 13:01

Based on the other answer, here's one that works:

var arr1 = [1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,4,3,5];
var arr2 = [];
var n, m;

for (var i=0, iLen=arr1.length; i < iLen; i++) {
  n = arr1[i];
  m = arr2[n];
  arr2[n] = m? ++m : 1;
}

alert(arr2)
share|improve this answer
    
It would be more readable to use || instead of the ternary operator: arr2[n] = (arr2[n] || 0) + 1 –  georg Mar 8 '12 at 12:22
    
For some, whichever way suits. More to type though. :-) –  RobG Mar 8 '12 at 23:00

You can use array_count_values:

<?php
     $array = array(1, "hello", 1, "world", "hello");
     print_r(array_count_values($array));
?>

The output is:

Array
(
    [1] => 2
    [hello] => 2
    [world] => 1
)
share|improve this answer
    
And use which javascript php live interpreter? –  Martin Mar 8 '12 at 11:33
    
Congratulations on not bothering to read the question whatsoever. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 11:36
    
Hmm my mistake ... –  botzko Mar 8 '12 at 11:39
1  
Two upvotes? What... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 '12 at 13:01
1  
There are other people that did not check the labels ... –  botzko Mar 8 '12 at 13:08

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