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I am looking for the fastest way to de/interleave a buffer. To be more specific, I am dealing with audio data, so I am trying to optimize the time I spend on splitting/combining channels and FFT buffers.

Currently I am using a for loop with 2 index variables for each array, so only plus operations, but all the managed array checks will not compare to a C pointer method.

I like the Buffer.BlockCopy and Array.Copy methods, which cut a lot of time when I process channels, but there is no way for an array to have a custom indexer.

I was trying to find a way to make an array mask, where it would be a fake array with a custom indexer, but that proves to be two times slower when using it in my FFT operation. I guess there are a lot of optimization tricks the compiler can pull when accessing an array directly, but accessing through a class indexer cannot be optimized.

I do not want an unsafe solution, although from the looks of it, that might be the only way to optimize this type of operation.

Thanks.

Here is the type of thing I'm doing right now:

private float[][] DeInterleave(float[] buffer, int channels)
{
    float[][] tempbuf = new float[channels][];
    int length = buffer.Length / channels;
    for (int c = 0; c < channels; c++)
    {
        tempbuf[c] = new float[length];
        for (int i = 0, offset = c; i < tempbuf[c].Length; i++, offset += channels)
            tempbuf[c][i] = buffer[offset];
    }
    return tempbuf;
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you provide a code fragment of what you are trying to do? It'll be a lot easier to help you with a concrete sample of what you are trying to achieve. – jerryjvl Jun 7 '09 at 11:15
up vote 5 down vote accepted

I ran some tests and here is the code I tested:

delegate(float[] inout)
{ // My Original Code
    float[][] tempbuf = new float[2][];
    int length = inout.Length / 2;
    for (int c = 0; c < 2; c++)
    {
        tempbuf[c] = new float[length];
        for (int i = 0, offset = c; i < tempbuf[c].Length; i++, offset += 2)
            tempbuf[c][i] = inout[offset];
    }
}
delegate(float[] inout)
{ // jerryjvl's recommendation: loop unrolling
    float[][] tempbuf = new float[2][];
    int length = inout.Length / 2;
    for (int c = 0; c < 2; c++)
        tempbuf[c] = new float[length];
    for (int ix = 0, i = 0; ix < length; ix++)
    {
        tempbuf[0][ix] = inout[i++];
        tempbuf[1][ix] = inout[i++];
    }

}
delegate(float[] inout)
{ // Unsafe Code
    unsafe
    {
        float[][] tempbuf = new float[2][];
        int length = inout.Length / 2;
        fixed (float* buffer = inout)
            for (int c = 0; c < 2; c++)
            {
                tempbuf[c] = new float[length];
                float* offset = buffer + c;
                fixed (float* buffer2 = tempbuf[c])
                {
                    float* p = buffer2;
                    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++, offset += 2)
                        *p++ = *offset;
                }
            }
    }
}
delegate(float[] inout)
{ // Modifying my original code to see if the compiler is not as smart as i think it is.
    float[][] tempbuf = new float[2][];
    int length = inout.Length / 2;
    for (int c = 0; c < 2; c++)
    {
        float[] buf = tempbuf[c] = new float[length];
        for (int i = 0, offset = c; i < buf.Length; i++, offset += 2)
            buf[i] = inout[offset];
    }
}

and results: (buffer size = 2^17, number iterations timed per test = 200)

Average for test #1:      0.001286 seconds +/- 0.000026
Average for test #2:      0.001193 seconds +/- 0.000025
Average for test #3:      0.000686 seconds +/- 0.000009
Average for test #4:      0.000847 seconds +/- 0.000008

Average for test #1:      0.001210 seconds +/- 0.000012
Average for test #2:      0.001048 seconds +/- 0.000012
Average for test #3:      0.000690 seconds +/- 0.000009
Average for test #4:      0.000883 seconds +/- 0.000011

Average for test #1:      0.001209 seconds +/- 0.000015
Average for test #2:      0.001060 seconds +/- 0.000013
Average for test #3:      0.000695 seconds +/- 0.000010
Average for test #4:      0.000861 seconds +/- 0.000009

I got similar results every test. Obviously the unsafe code is the fastest, but I was surprised to see that the CLS couldn't figure out that that it can drop the index checks when dealing with jagged array. Maybe someone can think of more ways to optimize my tests.

Edit: I tried loop unrolling with the unsafe code and it didn't have an effect. I also tried optimizing the loop unrolling method:

delegate(float[] inout)
{
    float[][] tempbuf = new float[2][];
    int length = inout.Length / 2;
    float[] tempbuf0 = tempbuf[0] = new float[length];
    float[] tempbuf1 = tempbuf[1] = new float[length];

    for (int ix = 0, i = 0; ix < length; ix++)
    {
        tempbuf0[ix] = inout[i++];
        tempbuf1[ix] = inout[i++];
    }
}

The results are also a hit-miss compared test#4 with 1% difference. Test #4 is my best way to go, so far.

As I told jerryjvl, the problem is getting the CLS to not index check the input buffer, since adding a second check (&& offset < inout.Length) will slow it down...

Edit 2: I ran the tests before in the IDE, so here are the results outside:

2^17 items, repeated 200 times
******************************************
Average for test #1:      0.000533 seconds +/- 0.000017
Average for test #2:      0.000527 seconds +/- 0.000016
Average for test #3:      0.000407 seconds +/- 0.000008
Average for test #4:      0.000374 seconds +/- 0.000008
Average for test #5:      0.000424 seconds +/- 0.000009

2^17 items, repeated 200 times
******************************************
Average for test #1:      0.000547 seconds +/- 0.000016
Average for test #2:      0.000732 seconds +/- 0.000020
Average for test #3:      0.000423 seconds +/- 0.000009
Average for test #4:      0.000360 seconds +/- 0.000008
Average for test #5:      0.000406 seconds +/- 0.000008


2^18 items, repeated 200 times
******************************************
Average for test #1:      0.001295 seconds +/- 0.000036
Average for test #2:      0.001283 seconds +/- 0.000020
Average for test #3:      0.001085 seconds +/- 0.000027
Average for test #4:      0.001035 seconds +/- 0.000025
Average for test #5:      0.001130 seconds +/- 0.000025

2^18 items, repeated 200 times
******************************************
Average for test #1:      0.001234 seconds +/- 0.000026
Average for test #2:      0.001319 seconds +/- 0.000023
Average for test #3:      0.001309 seconds +/- 0.000025
Average for test #4:      0.001191 seconds +/- 0.000026
Average for test #5:      0.001196 seconds +/- 0.000022

Test#1 = My Original Code
Test#2 = Optimized safe loop unrolling
Test#3 = Unsafe code - loop unrolling
Test#4 = Unsafe code
Test#5 = My Optimized Code

Looks like loop unrolling is not favorable. My optimized code is still my best way to go and with only 10% difference compared to the unsafe code. If only I could tell the compiler that (i < buf.Length) implies that (offset < inout.Length), it will drop the check (inout[offset]) and I will basically get the unsafe performance.

share|improve this answer
    
I think at this stage the question goes back to 'fast enough' ;) ... if the perf now keeps up with your needs then I'd pick the cleanest, easiest to follow implementation, and maybe leave the most optimal version with it in a comment... or the other way around. – jerryjvl Jun 7 '09 at 16:18
    
Well my original code was fast enough. I did not see any performance hits from; decoding 3 mp3 files (on the fly) with different sample rate, resampling, mixing, sending to winmm and openal. However, because I started pushing bitwise instead of base two math and replacing everything possible with Buffer.BlockCopy, I thought knowing the best way to deal with this problem will ensure good performance on less powerful machines (ex. windows mobile devices). – MaXKilleR Jun 7 '09 at 16:57
    
+1, not for answering your own question, but for sharing with the world the results of this useful exercise. – ja72 Apr 5 '12 at 13:38

As there's no built in function to do that, using array indexes is the fastest operation you could think of. Indexers and solutions like that only make things worse by introducing method calls and preventing the JIT optimizer to be able to optimize bound checks.

Anyway, I think your current method is the fastest non-unsafe solution you could be using. If performance really matter to you (which usually does in signal processing applications), you can do the whole thing in unsafe C# (which is fast enough, probably comparable with C) and wrap it in a method that you'd call from your safe methods.

share|improve this answer

It's not going to get you a major performance boost (I roughly measured 20% on my machine), but you could consider some loop unrolling for common cases. If most of the time you have a relatively limited number of channels:

static private float[][] Alternative(float[] buffer, int channels)
{
    float[][] result = new float[channels][];
    int length = buffer.Length / channels;
    for (int c = 0; c < channels; c++)
        result[c] = new float[length];

    int i = 0;
    if (channels == 8)
    {
        for (int ix = 0; ix < length; ix++)
        {
            result[0][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[1][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[2][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[3][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[4][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[5][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[6][ix] = buffer[i++];
            result[7][ix] = buffer[i++];
        }
    }
    else
        for (int ix = 0; ix < length; ix++)
            for (int ch = 0; ch < channels; ch++)
                result[ch][ix] = buffer[i++];


    return result;
}

As long as you leave the general fallback variant there it'll handle any number of channels, but you'll get a speed boost if it is one of the unrolled variants.

share|improve this answer
    
Along these lines you might be able to dynamically generate the unrolled version on the fly.... – Dolphin Jun 7 '09 at 13:07
    
I thought I would lose speed with that method, since I am accessing one array per iteration and the CLS will not need to reload sections. As far as I know it loads sections from an array, so accessing the next element in the next operation will be faster. – MaXKilleR Jun 7 '09 at 13:37
    
My quick test showed that for the 8 channels I use as an example and a fairly large buffer I gain about 20%. Not earth-shattering, but anything helps I guess? ... You may want to perform some realistic tests based on what you are actually doing though to make sure you get better performance for your scenario. – jerryjvl Jun 7 '09 at 13:42

Maybe some unrolling in your own best answer:

delegate(float[] inout)
{
    unsafe
    {
        float[][] tempbuf = new float[2][];
        int length = inout.Length / 2;

        fixed (float* buffer = inout)
        {
            float* pbuffer = buffer;

            tempbuf[0] = new float[length];
            tempbuf[1] = new float[length];

            fixed (float* buffer0 = tempbuf[0])
            fixed (float* buffer1 = tempbuf[1])
            {
                float* pbuffer0 = buffer0;
                float* pbuffer1 = buffer1;

                for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
                {
                    *pbuffer0++ = *pbuffer++;
                    *pbuffer1++ = *pbuffer++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This might get a little more performance still.

share|improve this answer
    
I tested your code and it’s a hit-miss. One run it’s faster the next it’s slower, and only by 1%. My best answer is test#4 so far. I need a safe solution. 20% difference between safe and unsafe is not bad but I still think it's possible to reduce that gap. The problem is forcing the CLS to not index check the input buffer. Adding another check (&& offset < inout.length) is slower because I am trading an unmanaged check for a managed one (per iteration). – MaXKilleR Jun 7 '09 at 14:51
    
If you really need top performance, then you may need to check the IL produced from the best answer you have so far and see if there is anything redundant that can be trimmed out. – jerryjvl Jun 7 '09 at 15:08
    
PS: I assume you have been doing all measurements outside the IDE, right? – jerryjvl Jun 7 '09 at 15:10
    
I know what's redundant. The index being checked by the input buffer, since it doesn't know that if (i < buf.Length) is true then (offset < inout.Length) must be true. That's the 20% difference in speed that the unsafe code has. I tested in the IDE. I didn't think that testing out will effect each test differently. I'll edit the test results. – MaXKilleR Jun 7 '09 at 15:37
1  
The IDE does weird things to performance measurements... only reliable performance measurement is running a 'Release' app directly. – jerryjvl Jun 7 '09 at 15:41

I think a lot of readers would question why you don't want an unsafe solution for something like audio processing. It's the type of thing that begs for hot-blooded optimization and I would peronally be unhappy knowing it's being forced through a vm.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no vm involved in safe code. – Henk Holterman Jun 7 '09 at 12:00
    
It's JIT compiled. The problem is not interpretation but array bound checks. – Mehrdad Afshari Jun 7 '09 at 12:09
    
I believe in safe code, and that it can match unsafe code by system dependent optimization. The moment you go unsafe, you are optimizing for a specific system and that destroys the whole point in using C#. If I wanted unsafe code, I would have used C++ but I want portability and speed at the same time. Basically, I’m trying to prove that things like signal processing can work just as fast in a managed language. – MaXKilleR Jun 7 '09 at 12:12
    
MaXKilleR: Unsafe can still be JIT optimized. It's not native code by any means. It has most if the benefits of safe code. – Mehrdad Afshari Jun 7 '09 at 12:22
    
Unverifiable code cannot be optimized in the same way. There are many ways to write code with pointer arithmetics and meaningful optimization is only achieved by developer modifications. C/C++ code is not machine code and thus is not native code (until you compile it), at least in my point of view. Besides, I want my code to run on any system regardless of security constraints. – MaXKilleR Jun 7 '09 at 13:21

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