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I understand that if I pass a value-type (int, struct, etc.) as a parameter (without the ref keyword), a copy of that variable is passed to the method, but if I use the ref keyword a reference to that variable is passed, not a new one.

But with reference-types, like classes, even without the ref keyword, a reference is passed to the method, not a copy. So what is the use of the ref keyword with reference-types?


Take for example:

var x = new Foo();

What is the difference between the following?

void Bar(Foo y) {
    y.Name = "2";
}

and

void Bar(ref Foo y) {
    y.Name = "2";
}
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8 Answers 8

up vote 67 down vote accepted

You can change what foo points to using y:

Foo foo = new Foo("1");

void Bar(ref Foo y)
{
    y = new Foo("2");
}

Bar(ref foo);
// foo.Name == "2"
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3  
so you basically get a reference to the original reference –  lhahne Jun 7 '09 at 11:17
1  
You can change what the original reference 'refers' to, so yes. –  user7116 Jun 7 '09 at 11:26
    
Chris, your explanation is great; Thanks for helping me understand this concept. –  Andreas Grech Jun 8 '09 at 5:42
    
So using 'ref' on an object is like using double pointers in C++? –  Tom Hazel Apr 24 '12 at 13:42
    
@TomHazel: -ish, provided you're using "double" pointers in C++ to change what a pointer points to. –  user7116 Apr 24 '12 at 14:09

There are cases where you want to modify the actual reference and not the object pointed to:

void Swap<T>(ref T x, ref T y) {
    T t = x;
    x = y;
    y = t;
}

var test = new[] { "0", "1" };
Swap(ref test[0], ref test[1]);
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Jon Skeet wrote a great article about parameter passing in C#. It details clearly the exact behaviour and usage of passing parameters by value, by reference (ref), and by output (out).

Here's an important quote from that page in relation to ref parameters:

Reference parameters don't pass the values of the variables used in the function member invocation - they use the variables themselves. Rather than creating a new storage location for the variable in the function member declaration, the same storage location is used, so the value of the variable in the function member and the value of the reference parameter will always be the same. Reference parameters need the ref modifier as part of both the declaration and the invocation - that means it's always clear when you're passing something by reference.

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5  
I like the analogy of passing your dogs leash to friend for passing a reference by-value... it breaks down quickly though, because I think you would probably notice if your friend traded-up your shitzu to a doberman before he handed you back the leash ;-) –  corlettk Jun 7 '09 at 12:12

When you pass a reference type with the ref keyword, you pass the reference by reference, and the method you call can assign a new value to the parameter. That change will propagate to the calling scope. Without ref, the reference is passed by value, and this doesn't happen.

C# also has the 'out' keyword which is a lot like ref, except that with 'ref', arguments must be initialized before calling the method, and with 'out' you must assign a value in the receiving method.

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Another bunch of code

class O
{
    public int prop = 0;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        O o1 = new O();
        o1.prop = 1;

        O o2 = new O();
        o2.prop = 2;

        o1modifier(o1);
        o2modifier(ref o2);

        Console.WriteLine("1 : " + o1.prop.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("2 : " + o2.prop.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void o1modifier(O o)
    {
        o = new O();
        o.prop = 3;
    }

    static void o2modifier(ref O o)
    {
        o = new O();
        o.prop = 4;
    }
}
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1  
Output:\r\n 1 : 1 \r\n 2 : 4 –  Archie Apr 9 '10 at 12:21

It allows you to modify the reference passed in. e.g.

void Bar()
{
    var y = new Foo();
    Baz(ref y);
}

void Baz(ref Foo y)
{
    y.Name = "2";

    // Overwrite the reference
    y = new Foo();
}

You can also use out if you don't care about the reference passed in:

void Bar()
{
    var y = new Foo();
    Baz(out y);
}

void Baz(out Foo y)
{
    // Return a new reference
    y = new Foo();
}
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A parameter in a method seems to be always passing a copy, the question is a copy of what. A copy is done by a copy constructor for an object and since all variables are Object in C#, i believe this is the case for all of them. Variables(objects) are like people living at some addresses. We either change the people living at those addresses or we can create more references to the people living at those addresses in the phone book(make shallow copies). So, more than one identifier can refer to the same address. Reference types desire more space, so unlike value types that are directly connected by an arrow to their identifier in the stack, they have value for another address in the heap( a bigger space to dwell). This space needs to be taken from the heap.

Value type: Indentifier(contains value =address of stack value)---->Value of value type

Reference type: Identifier(contains value=address of stack value)---->(contains value=address of heap value)---->Heap value(most often contains addresses to other values), imagine more arrows sticking in different directions to Array[0], Array[1], array[2]

The only way to change a value is to follow the arrows. If one arrow gets lost/changed in the way the value is unreachable.

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Very nicely explained here : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/s6938f28.aspx

Thanks.

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