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I wrote the following code to log in to my application using C# and LINQ. It connected to a SQL service oriented database that I have created in Visual Studio. The problem that I am having is one that I do not understand and am hoping that someone can help me about here. I have created two message boxed to try to see the output of my code buy I am not getting anything from it.

If anyone could help that would be great!

public bool UserLogin(string User, string Pass)
{
    var Database = new ExampleDataSet();

    var query = from Employee in Database.Employee
        where (Employee.EmployeeID.ToString() == Employee.ToLower() && Employee.Password == Pass)
        select Employee;

    if (query.Count() != 0)
    {
        return true;
        MessageBox.Show("You are logged in");
    }

    return false;
    MessageBox.Show("You are not logged in");
}

private void cmdLogin_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string User = (txtUser.Text);
    string Pass = (txtPass.Text);
    UserLogin(User, Pass);
}
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Maybe try encapsulating the password in quotes? If you debug are you sending the same values that are in the database? –  Gage Mar 8 '12 at 13:51

6 Answers 6

From the code you wrote, it seems that the problem is that you compare the string representation of an Employee with its EmployeeId property Employee.EmployeeID.ToString() == Employee.ToLower(). This line will always return false unless you override ToString() method of Employee class to return the property EmployeeId (which I presume you didn't). Try this instead (assuming that parameter User contains the name of the user):

using(var dataSet = new ExampleDataSet())
{
    var loggedIn = dataSet.Employee.Any(e=>e.UserName == User && e.Password == Pass);
    var message = loggedIn ? "You are logged in" : "You are not logged in";
    MessageBox.Show(message);
    return loggedIn;
}
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The user ID is going to be the user name. I actually removed the ToLower and changed the data type to an Int but I still keep getting a message saying that I am not logged in. –  Ian Macdonald Mar 8 '12 at 12:58
    
Try opening the Sql Server profiler to see the exact sql query executed against the database and check the query parameter values against database values. –  RePierre Mar 8 '12 at 13:40

When you return, the function execution will stop, because it's done and will return the value to what it was called from. So anything after your return won't happen. Try putting MessageBox.Show before return:

MessageBox.Show("You are logged in");
return true;

And the same for the false version.

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The Message boxes wont show as they are after the return statements - move your message boxes to before the returns to see them.

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I have made changes in your code....Your if-else part is not valid......You are comparign employee.ID with employee itself..Try out with following code.....

            public bool UserLogin(string User, string Pass)
            {

                var Database = new ExampleDataSet();

                var query = from Employee in Database.Employee
                            where (Employee.EmployeeID.ToString().ToLower().Equals(User.ToLower())&& Employee.Password.ToString().ToLower().Equals(Pass.ToLower())
                            select Employee;

                if (query.Count() != 0)
                {
                    MessageBox.Show("You are logged in");
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    MessageBox.Show("You are not logged in");
                    return false;
                }



            }

            private void cmdLogin_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
            {
            string User = (txtUser.Text);
            string Pass = (txtPass.Text);
            UserLogin(User, Pass);
            }
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The EmployeeID is actually represented as an Integer in the database. I have tried changing the code to represent this and I keep getting a message saying that the user is not logged in. –  Ian Macdonald Mar 8 '12 at 13:12

If you mean user = employeeId

Employee.EmployeeID.ToString() == user.ToLower() 

if not :

Employee.EmployeeName.ToLower() == user.ToLower() 

About the message box, you should know any statement after return will not be executed

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1  
The question seems to be why he doesn't get any output from his MessageBoxes though... –  Joakim Johansson Mar 8 '12 at 12:29

Writing your own user authentication is not recommended. It is very difficult to do it right, and in most cases you can use one that is already provided by Windows or the dot net framework.

For example, your application should not store the users passwords in plain text. If your application or database is compromised, the attacker will not only gain full access to your application, but a list of passwords which it is likely the users have also used elsewhere.

If you need to store the users credentials, they should first be salted, and then hashed with a secure hashing algorithm. This prevents anyone who gains access to the database from learning users passwords.

To verify the password, you look up the salt in the database, append the password to it, hash the result, and then compare that with the stored value. If they are the same, then the user entered the correct password.

If you are writing an application that will be used in a windows domain, you can use Active Directory groups to control access to your application. On the simplest level, you can store your application in a folder which is only accessible by the authorised users.

You can also use groups to control access to the database the application connects to. If you are using SQL server, each group should be placed in a SQL database role, which is in turn granted the necessary permissions for that role.

From within the application, you can look up the users group membership, and use it to determine which forms / menu options to show, or exit the application if they are not authorised.

If you are writing an ASP.Net application, consider using MemberShip and Roles which are built in to the framework.

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