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My question concerns why one piece of code works and two that does not, and how i can get the code that does not work to work.

The code that works:

mysql_select_db("webuser1", $con);

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ('value1', 'value2')");

mysql_close($con);

Code no1 that does not ($var1 contains 'value1' etc.):

mysql_select_db("webuser1", $con);

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ($var1, $var2)");

mysql_close($con);

And code no2 that does not work ($_POST['value1'] contains 'value1' etc.):

mysql_select_db("webuser1", $con);

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ($_POST['value1'], $_POST['value2'])");

mysql_close($con);

Am i not supposed to be able to insert $var or $_POST in mysql? I hope you do not find this Q stupid but i have been looking around for solutions but i have not understood them. Thank you

share|improve this question
    
You can insert $_POST directly in a query, but you shouldn't –  Damien Pirsy Mar 8 '12 at 13:00
    
The solution you are looking for is just a basic syntax. Learning the syntax of the language you are using is essential. –  Your Common Sense Mar 8 '12 at 13:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In SQL, string values need to be quoted:

VALUES ('value1', 'value2')"

When you use variables:

VALUES ($var1, $var2)");

They are not quoted … unless the quotes are in the values themselves.

So if $var1 = 'value1'; $var2 = 'value2' then (after the variables are interpolated in your string) your SQL looks like this:

VALUES (value1, value2)"

You could resolve your immediate problem by adding quotes:

VALUES ('$var1', '$var2')");

but this doesn't fix your major security vulnerability and lets your data break the query in different ways.

You should avoid creating SQL statements by assembling strings from variables. This way leads to SQL Injection security holes. Use an interface that supports bound arguments. They will handle quoting and escaping for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that there are security risks, but i'm doing this on my local web server in my LAN only to understand how it works, it is not being used anywhere where security is an issue. Thank you for the good answer. –  Sergei Mar 8 '12 at 13:15
    
A typo in the input data could cause problems with the data, so trusting all the users is not a sensible idea. Doing things The Right Way is not arduous and you should make it a habit to follow best practises. –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:18
    
@Sergei this is just wrong answer. There is no security issue but only formatting issue. Strings in the SQL query should be quoted and escaped, or you will have a malformed query. This is a syntax rule and you have to follow it always. –  Your Common Sense Mar 8 '12 at 13:25

One thing you have to understand:
You can't insert $variable or $_POST value into mysql table.

You can insert them in another PHP variable only.

Which variable, if happens to be a valid SQL query, can be sent to mysql, which will add corresponding values in table.

So, you have to learn proper PHP strings syntax first.

So, PHP lets you 3 different ways of adding an associative array member into string:

$array['key'] = 'world';
$str = "Hello ".$array['key'];
$str = "Hello {$array['key']}";
$str = "Hello $array[key]";

You also have issues with SQL syntax.
Strings in the SQL query have to be escaped and quoted. Your code lacks both.

share|improve this answer

Seems like you're not escaping and quoting your arguments to mysql properly.

To insert variables in MySQL you need to escape them at least: $var = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['variable']) and then ".. VALUES ('".$var."')"

You should also probably consider using libraries for connecting to MySQL like DOCTRINE: http://www.doctrine-project.org/ that handles this for you.

share|improve this answer
    
PDO (or mysqli) would be enough, a full-fledged ORM like doctrine could be too much for simple tasks –  Damien Pirsy Mar 8 '12 at 13:02

mysql needs single quotes to enclose a string... so you would need something like this:

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ('".$_POST['value1']."', '".$_POST['value2']."')");

for everything that is not a string you won't need the single quotes (')

as mentioned before you should not forget to escape strings that you want to put into the database. for example use prepared statements. by binding the parameters it is ensured that your passed value is of the type you specified within the prepared statement.

share|improve this answer
    
The code here has a security vulnerability. Make sure you pay attention to the last paragraph of the answer. –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:02

It seems that you are forgetting the quotation marks in the first one. Try:

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ('$var1', '$var2')");

For the second one, try this way:

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ('" . $_POST['value1'] . "', '" . $_POST['value2'] . "')");
share|improve this answer
    
Danger: This has a security vulnerability –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:05
mysql_select_db("webuser1", $con);

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ('$var1', '$var2')");

mysql_close($con);

When not using Apostrophes around values, it is supposed to be non string value.

share|improve this answer
    
Apostrophes, not commas –  jprofitt Mar 8 '12 at 13:03
    
Danger: This has a security vulnerability –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:04

Your variables are not recognized as variables. They are a part of your string.

Try:

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ('".$var1."', '".$var2."')");

Same for your second problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Danger: This has a security vulnerability –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:02
    
That won't fix the problem either because it still isn't inserting quotes into the final SQL. –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:03
    
Edits mean that the code now works, but it still has the SQL injection problem. –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:13

Because the POST variables have ' in them, you have to concatenate instead.

I.E.

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES (".$_POST['value1'].", ".$_POST['value2'].")");

Or

mysql_query("INSERT INTO users (column 1, column2) VALUES ({$_POST['value1']}, {$_POST['value2']})");

It's also a good idea to put quotes around the variables, in case its empty (or a string rather than an integer)

share|improve this answer
    
Danger: This has a security vulnerability. It won't work anyway, the final SQL needs quotes around the values. –  Quentin Mar 8 '12 at 13:03

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