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When extending a class, is there any difference in performance between polymorphism and composition? Take the following example using composition (in C++):

class Window
{
    public:
        Window(Renderer &renderer) : m_renderer(renderer)
        { }

        void update()
        {
            ....
            m_renderer.draw(this);
        }
    private:
        Renderer &m_renderer;
}

... and using polymorphism:

class Window : public Renderer
{
    public:
        virtual ~Window() {};

        void update()
        {
            ...
            draw();
        }
    protected:
        virtual void draw() = 0;
}

The composition version uses a reference as a member so I suppose that it requires a little more space, but is there any performance gain in either version?

Note: I have checked out similar post such as this, but is does not cover performance.

Thank you for your answers!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, if you pose the question like this, then yes there is a memory/speed trade-off.

1. Composition

  • 8 bytes (on 64 bits architecture) are likely to be used for the reference

2. Inheritance

  • 8 bytes (on 64 bits architecture) if you need to make your class polymorphic (v-pointer)
  • some overhead for the attributes of the base class if any (note: inheriting from stateful classes is a code smell)
  • ~20% overhead for the virtual call (gross estimate, lots of variation there)

So you might say that inheritance is slightly more costly... but really it's just invisible. The overhead of a function call compared to the inner computation required for graphic rendering is just negligible.


On the other hand, the semantics differ. Whether you inherit or not is significant. Is you Window a Renderer ? Does it make sense ?

Write sane code first. Then optimize as (if !!!) needed.

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Inheritance means that the size of the class increasez by at least the size of the base class. It's not only the vftable that adds to the size, but the base class itself. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 8 '12 at 13:13
    
@LuchianGrigore: yes, but I have no idea about the size of the Renderer class, for all I know it's stateless. Still, worth noting. –  Matthieu M. Mar 8 '12 at 13:16
    
Well this size will anyway increase as much... Unless you share Renderer instances between different Windows. –  Jens Åkerblom Mar 8 '12 at 13:17
    
@JensÅkerblom not if you use a reference. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 8 '12 at 13:18
    
@MatthieuM. a more correct statement would be that it increases by at least 8 bytes, not by 8. It's just misleading. You can't just assume it's stateless. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 8 '12 at 13:19
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I suppose you want the second version to be:

class Window : public Renderer

in which case, the memory by inheritance will actually be bigger. That's because, when you inherit something, the class increases in size by at least the sizeof the base class.

The first version actually only suffers a minor increase in size, as you're storing a reference and not an actual object. The following:

class Window
{
    public:
        Window(Renderer &renderer) : m_renderer(renderer)
        { }

        void update()
        {
            ....
            m_renderer.draw(this);
        }
    private:
        Renderer m_renderer; //no reference
}

would take up more space.

More important than anything when deciding between these two is not performance-wise (differences are minor, if at all), but the relationship between the two. Composition and inheritance describe different things.

If a Window is a Renderer, use inheritance. If a Windows has a Renderer, use composition.

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True. But someone sometime told me "Reuse using composition". And here we can change the symancics to "Window" is "Renderable" vs "Window" has a "Renderer". –  Jens Åkerblom Mar 8 '12 at 13:20
    
@JensÅkerblom are you reusing or extending the functionality? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 8 '12 at 13:23
    
Well the Window class is reused, and the update-method is extended so... both? But this is slightly outside the topic. –  Jens Åkerblom Mar 8 '12 at 13:29
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