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I have a query that works really well. But I am trying to add a filter so if users_in_this_country is > 1. I know to add users_in_this_country > 1 to the WHERE. But if I add it inside the parenthesis it says invalid column and the same if I add it outside of the parenthesis. This is probably really dumb and easy, but what am I over looking? Thanks!

SELECT u.ContactName
      ,cu.[User ID]
      ,c.Name
      ,c.ID
      ,cu.[Foreign Table]
      ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY c.ID) AS user_in_this_country
FROM   dbo.Country AS c
INNER JOIN   dbo.CountryUser AS cu ON c.ID = cu.[Foreign ID]
INNER JOIN   dbo.UserColder  AS  u ON cu.[User ID] = u.ID
WHERE EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM   CountryUser AS cu2
    WHERE  cu2.[Foreign ID] = cu.[Foreign ID]
    AND    cu2.[User ID] <> cu.[User ID]
    AND    cu.[Foreign Table] = 'Country')
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Please tell me that user_in_this_country (singular user) is a typo and that you meant to type user s !! Otherwise it really is dumb and easy :-) –  paxdiablo Mar 8 '12 at 13:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With aggregate functions (like COUNT) used in conjuction with OVER clause you have to use a CTE or a subquery, like this

 WITH CTE AS (
      SELECT u.ContactName
          ,cu.[User ID]
          ,c.Name
          ,c.ID
          ,cu.[Foreign Table]
          ,count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY c.ID) AS user_in_this_country
      FROM   dbo.Country AS c
      INNER JOIN   dbo.CountryUser AS cu ON c.ID = cu.[Foreign ID]
      INNER JOIN   dbo.UserColder  AS  u ON cu.[User ID] = u.ID
      WHERE EXISTS (
          SELECT *
          FROM   CountryUser AS cu2
          WHERE  cu2.[Foreign ID] = cu.[Foreign ID]
          AND    cu2.[User ID] <> cu.[User ID]
          AND    cu.[Foreign Table] = 'Country')
 )
 SELECT *
 FROM CTE
 WHERE user_in_this_country > 1
share|improve this answer

The reason you can't refer to it in the WHERE clause is that its very meaning, for a given row, depends on what other rows satisfy the WHERE clause; so it would all be too circular.

The simplest fix is to wrap your entire query in SELECT * FROM ( ... ) t WHERE t.user_in_this_country > 1.

That said, it seems like your query already ensures that user_in_this_country > 1, by virtue of the EXISTS clause, which makes sure that there exists a different CountryUser record that belongs to the same Country and a different User. What am I missing?

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Ah yes, the EXISTS is checking to make sure another user exists for the same [Foreign ID] right? Which I assume should imply user_in_this_country > 1. –  Umair Mar 8 '12 at 13:25

Because "users_in_this_country" is not a column, it is an alias which is not valid in the scope of the WHERE clause. I 'm not familiar with "OVER" or PARTITION BY but, my guess is you'd have to do something like this:

WHERE blabla AND (count(*) OVER (PARTITION BY c.ID)) > 1
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"users_in_this_country" is not a valid column name at the WHERE clause level. It is an availalbe column name at the ORDER BY level. –  JeffO Mar 8 '12 at 13:36
    
@JeffO not sure how availability in the ORDER BY clause is relevant to the problem? –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 8 '12 at 14:02

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