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I have a filename in the following format:

xx_xx_xx_xx/Run02/isf2sync_output/xx_xx_xx_xx_xx_Run02_xxx3_20120301_144327/xx_xx_xx_xx_xx_Run02_xxx3_20120301_144395.x.x.x.log

I want to extract the date from it, in this case 20120301144327 and 20120301144395.

I have been using (\d+) to get the numerical value. How can i skip the first number values and get the desired one?

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1  
what do you mean "first number values"? are you referring to the Run02/isf2sync string, or you want to skip the first timestamp and fetch the second? if you're sure about your numbers length (ie they are always the same length), you can write a regex matching exactly the same amount of single numbers (say 8 in 20120301) –  Samuele Mattiuzzo Mar 8 '12 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand your needs, how about:

my $str = 'xx_xx_xx_xx/Run02/isf2sync_output/xx_xx_xx_xx_xx_Run02_xxx3_20120301_144327/xx_xx_xx_xx_xx_Run02_xxx3_20120301_144395.x.x.x.log';
my (undef, $second) = $str =~ /\d{8}_\d{6}/g;
say $second;

output:

20120301_144395
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If I understand your need correctly, you can use something like (\d{8})_(\d{6}) to match exactly the number of digits you need, then you can compose the result using the two capturing groups.

For your example, it would match twice:

20120301_144327 and 20120301_144395

If you want to keep it simple, just get the whole thing in one capturing group, something like: (\d{8}_\d{6}) And then replace the _ with something else (or nothing).

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perfect, thanks –  fammi Mar 9 '12 at 15:30

If you're sure the date will always be an 8 digit number, then something like :

my ($date) = ($fileName =~ m/_(\d{8})_/);
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You can try my regex, although it only gets 20120301_144327, because it doesn't recognize 144395 as a valid time value for HHMMSS (and not even for seconds after midnight!).

my $re 
    = qr/ (?: \D | ^ )
          ( \d{2} \d{2,}?            # Y3K? not a problem. Y10K? Not a problem
            (?: 0[1-9] | 1[012] )
            (?: 0[1-9] | [12]\d | 3[01] )
            _
            (?: [01]\d | 2[0-3] )
            (?: [0-5]\d ){2}
          )
          (?: \D | $ )
       /x;

You could even try my more elaborate (and sillier) regex:

      qr/ (?: \D | ^ )
          ( \d{2} (?: \d{2,} )?
            (?: (?: 0[946]   | 11 )    (?: 0[1-9]| [12]\d | 30 )
            |   (?: 0[13578] | 1[02] ) (?: 0[1-9]| [12]\d | 3[01] )
            |   02                     (?: 0[1-9]| [12]\d )
            )
            _
            (?: [01]\d | 2[0-3] )
            (?: [0-5]\d ){2}
          )
          (?: \D | $ )
       /x;
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