Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having trouble parsing XML when it is in the form of:

<Cars>
    <Car>
        <Color>Blue</Color>
        <Make>Ford</Make>
        <Model>Mustant</Model>
    </Car>
    <Car>
        <Color>Red</Color>
        <Make>Chevy</Make>
        <Model>Camaro</Model>
    </Car>
</Cars>

I have figured out how to parse 1st level children like this:

<Car>
    <Color>Blue</Color>
    <Make>Chevy</Make>
    <Model>Camaro</Model>
</Car>

With this kind of code:

from lxml import etree
    a = os.path.join(localPath,file)
    element = etree.parse(a)
    cars = element.xpath('//Root/Foo/Bar/Car/node()[text()]')
    parsedCars = [{field.tag: field.text for field in cars} for action in cars]
    print parsedCars[0]['Make'] #Chevy

How can I parse our multiple "Car" tags that is a child tag of "Cars"?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this

from lxml import etree
    a = os.path.join(localPath,file)
    element = etree.parse(a)
    cars = element.xpath('//Root/Foo/Bar/Car')
    for car in cars:
        colors = car.xpath('./Color')
        makes = car.xpath('./Make')
        models = car.xpath('./Model')
share|improve this answer
    
When I run this code to find Color I get the address and not the actual object. For example, when trying to find color I get [<Element Color at 0x2a9f0f8>] –  lodkkx Mar 8 '12 at 13:39
    
They return the element object. To get the text use the xpath './Color/text()' –  Dikei Mar 8 '12 at 13:45
    
Yea I actually figured it out - but used './Color/node()' instead. What is the different between the two - they both give me the text. –  lodkkx Mar 8 '12 at 13:47
2  
node() select all node, text() select only text node. In this instance, there are only text nodes so they perform the same. –  Dikei Mar 8 '12 at 14:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.