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I have two methods, for example Method1 and Method2. How can I invoke Method2 500ms after Method1 completes?

 public void Method1()
 {

 }

 public void Method2()
 {

 }
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Have you looked at the Timer or BackgroundWorker classes at all? –  TrueBlueAussie Mar 8 '12 at 13:28
    
Can you put the question in a specific context, like what you are trying to achieve by a 500 millisecond delay. –  Lloyd Mar 8 '12 at 13:29
    
Yes, but I can't find an example that will be useful for me –  revolutionkpi Mar 8 '12 at 13:30
    
You need to rephrase the question. Running "in 500 ms" means you expect the method to take 500ms or less to run, which can only be achieved by optimization or deoptimization. I suspect you want it to run every 500ms, however, which involves timers. –  ssube Mar 8 '12 at 13:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Task.Factory.StartNew( () => 
{
    Methdd1();
    Thread.Sleep(500);
    Method2();
});

EDIT

Due to the issue highlighted by @spender this code is problematic and could lead to thread starvation (see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff963549.aspx). The timer suggested by @HiTech Magic seems a better way to go.

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3  
Yikes. Sleeping in a method running in the ThreadPool? This is bad design. ThreadPool jobs should finish quickly, otherwise there's a risk of starvation. -1. Use a Timer. –  spender Mar 8 '12 at 13:53
    
Thanks @spender, was not aware of that issue. OP can you please unselect this answer so I can delete? –  Phil Degenhardt Mar 8 '12 at 14:24
    
Thanks. I will use it too. Is a quick solution. Better than implementing a timer... –  Patrick Mar 21 '13 at 9:06

Use either the Timer or a BackgroundWorker. Timer is probably most appropriate for your brief description unless you want to do something on the UI thread in which case a DispatchTimer is better for you as it calls back on the UI thread.

Example:

  public void Run_Method1_Then_Method2_500_Milliseconds_Later()
  {
      DispatcherTimer timer = new DispatcherTimer();
      timer.Interval = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(500);
      timer.Tick += (s, e) =>
      {
          // do some quick work here in Method2
          Method2(timer);
      };

      Method1();      // Call Method1 and wait for completion
      timer.Start();  // Start Method2 500 milliseconds later
  }

  public void Method1()
  {
      // Do some work here
  }

  public void Method2(DispatcherTimer timer)
  {
      // Stop additional timer events
      timer.Stop();
      // Now do some work here
  }
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Just in case it's not obvious, with the example as-is, Method2() is going to get called repeatedly, every 500 ms, until the app gets shut down. The timer can't be garbage collected, either, until Stop() is called, or maybe if the thread shuts down. If the DispatcherTimer object is set to a private field instead of a local variable, then Method2() can call Stop(). –  Ron Sep 13 '13 at 1:44
    
@Ron: Thanks. Yep, I forgot about that (trying to keep example simple). Have simply passed the timer to the timer event as I feel that is cleaner than using shared variables. –  TrueBlueAussie Sep 13 '13 at 8:12
    
Cool! Thanks for the improvement and the great answer. +1 –  Ron Sep 20 '13 at 0:14
System.Timers.Timer aTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(10000);
// Hook up the Elapsed event for the timer.
aTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);
// Set the Interval to 60 seconds (60000 milliseconds).
aTimer.Interval = 60000;
//for enabling for disabling the timer.
aTimer.Enabled = false;

private void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
 //disable the timer
 aTimer.Enabled = false;
 Method2();
}
public void Method1()
{
 //some code
 aTimer.Enabled = true;
}
public void Method2()
{


}
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