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I'm having some strange problem with my JS program. I had this working properly but for some reason it's no longer working. I just want to find the value of the radio button (which one is selected) and return it to a variable. For some reason it keeps returning undefined. Here is my code:

function findSelection(field) {
    var test = 'document.theForm.' + field;
    var sizes = test;

    alert(sizes);
        for (i=0; i < sizes.length; i++) {
            if (sizes[i].checked==true) {
            alert(sizes[i].value + ' you got a value');     
            return sizes[i].value;
        }
    }
}

submitForm:

function submitForm() {

    var genderS =  findSelection("genderS");
    alert(genderS);
}

HTML:

<form action="#n" name="theForm">

    <label for="gender">Gender: </label>
    <input type="radio" name="genderS" value="1" checked> Male
    <input type="radio" name="genderS" value="0" > Female<br><br>
    <a href="javascript: submitForm()">Search</A>
</form>
share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

up vote 156 down vote accepted

jQuery:

$('input[name="genderS"]:checked').val();

http://jsfiddle.net/Xxxd3/609/

javascript:

var radios = document.getElementsByName('genderS');

for (var i = 0, length = radios.length; i < length; i++) {
    if (radios[i].checked) {
        // do whatever you want with the checked radio
        alert(radios[i].value);

        // only one radio can be logically checked, don't check the rest
        break;
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/Xxxd3/610/

Edit: Thanks HATCHA and jpsetung for your edit suggestions.

share|improve this answer
    
Works great! Thanks! –  mkyong Mar 8 '12 at 14:07
7  
Don't forget break; when you got it. –  HATCHA Mar 18 '13 at 10:20
43  
Thx for not just posting the jQuery way ;) –  Cromax Mar 22 '13 at 11:19
4  
That was working for jquery 1.7 but now the correct syntax for jQuery 1.9 is $('input[name="genderS"]:checked').val(); (remove the @) –  jptsetung Jun 4 '13 at 15:19
1  
I believe the @ syntax was deprecated even earlier than that (jquery 1.2) –  Tom Pietrosanti Jun 21 '13 at 12:24

This works with any explorer..

document.querySelector('input[name="genderS"]:checked').value;

It is the purest way to get the value of any input type.. You need to include jQuery path as well..

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1  
Since the asker did not mention jQuery anywhere, it would probably be better to give a pure JavaScript answer. If you have to use jQuery, should it not rather be: $('input:radio[name="genderS"]:checked').val() ? –  neelsg Jul 22 '14 at 12:05
    
Using document.querySelector() is a pure javascript answer: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/document.querySelector –  AdamJonR Feb 9 at 6:05
    
If you store it in a variabel and no radiobutton is selected you cause the browser to stop. Console says: TypeError document.querySelector(...) is null. –  call-me May 23 at 22:44

Since jQuery 1.8, the correct syntax for the query is

$('input[name="genderS"]:checked').val();

Not $('input[@name="genderS"]:checked').val(); anymore, which was working in jQuery 1.7 (with the @).

share|improve this answer
    
That helped me too! :) Thanks for this one. hehehe.. –  Afzaal Ahmad Zeeshan Sep 20 '13 at 7:46
    
minus 1 for using jQuery –  barwnikk Mar 27 at 23:24
    
@barwnikk, that was an additional information on jbabey approved answer, he modified it since then. –  jptsetung Mar 28 at 13:28

Try this

function findSelection(field) {
    var test = document.getElementsByName(field);
    var sizes = test.length;
    alert(sizes);
    for (i=0; i < sizes; i++) {
            if (test[i].checked==true) {
            alert(test[i].value + ' you got a value');     
            return test[i].value;
        }
    }
}


function submitForm() {

    var genderS =  findSelection("genderS");
    alert(genderS);
    return false;
}

A fiddle here.

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Edit: As said by Chips_100 you should use :

var sizes = document.theForm[field];

directly without using the test variable.


Old answer:

Shouldn't you eval like this ?

var sizes = eval(test);

I don't know how that works, but to me you're only copying a string.

share|improve this answer
    
eval is not the best option here... you might want to say var sizes = document.theForm[field]; and delete the first assignment, so not using test variable anymore. –  Chips_100 Mar 8 '12 at 13:43
    
For my knowledge, would eval work as is? Or would it work only with eval('var sizes=document.theForm.' + field) ? –  Michael Laffargue Mar 8 '12 at 13:53
    
the eval statement in your answer var sizes = eval(test); would work that way (i just testet it in firebug). –  Chips_100 Mar 8 '12 at 13:59
    
That makes more sense, but I'm getting an error "Unexpected token [" on that line where I put field in brackets. Any guesses as to why? –  mkyong Mar 8 '12 at 14:00
    
Check here : jsfiddle.net/Qm8CS –  Michael Laffargue Mar 8 '12 at 14:04

Here is an Example for Radios where no Checked="checked" attribute is used

function test() {
var radios = document.getElementsByName("radiotest");
var found = 1;
for (var i = 0; i < radios.length; i++) {       
    if (radios[i].checked) {
        alert(radios[i].value);
        found = 0;
        break;
    }
}
   if(found == 1)
   {
     alert("Please Select Radio");
   }    
}

DEMO : http://jsfiddle.net/ipsjolly/hgdWp/2/ [Click Find without selecting any Radio]

Source : http://bloggerplugnplay.blogspot.in/2013/01/validateget-checked-radio-value-in.html

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Using a pure javascript, you can handle the reference to the object that dispatched the event.

function (event) {
    console.log(event.target.value);
}
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The simplest solution:

 document.querySelector('input[name=genderS]:checked').value

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This is pure JavaScript, based on the answer by @Fontas but with safety code to return an empty string (and avoid a TypeError) if there isn't a selected radio button:

var genderSRadio = document.querySelector("input[name=genderS]:checked");
var genderSValue = genderSRadio ? genderSRadio.value : "";

The code breaks down like this:

  • Line 1: get a reference to the control that (a) is an <input> type, (b) has a name attribute of genderS, and (c) is checked.
  • Line 2: If there is such a control, return its value. If there isn't, return an empty string. The genderSRadio variable is truthy if Line 1 finds the control and null/falsey if it doesn't.

For JQuery, use @jbabey's answer, and note that if there isn't a selected radio button it will return undefined.

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document.forms.your-form-name.elements.radio-button-name.value
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1  
Your answer probably could be more verbose... –  h22 Jan 29 '13 at 10:49
var value= $("input:radio['@name=radiogroupname']:checked").val()
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an explanation would be nice. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 7 '13 at 14:03
    
@JanDvorak this is script needs jquery. $(x) = selector, $(x).val() = selector value. Selector description: input = get inpput elements, :radio = get only radio inputs (same as [type=radio], ['@name=radiogroupname'] same as [name=radiogroupname] = get radio inputs width name radiogroupname, :checked = get only the checked one –  user669677 Mar 22 '13 at 11:15
    
@2astalavista I mean, explanation from the answerer directly within the answer. The answer looks bare without it. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 22 '13 at 12:09
    
@JanDvorak should I edit the answer? –  user669677 Mar 22 '13 at 12:10
1  
-1 Javascript is not jQuery. –  Ed Daniel Jun 6 '13 at 12:12
    var value = $('input:radio[name="radiogroupname"]:checked').val();
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