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Is this possible? Say you have the following:

var x = new { name = "name", age = 22 };

Is it possible to then add or append a property to this object? So at a later stage I could add height to make it { name = "name", age = 22, height = 1.9 };.

It doesn't have to be elegant just looking for a way to recast or something to add in a new property.

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Are you .NET 4? Sounds like you want a dynamic type, not an anonymous one. –  Marc Mar 8 '12 at 14:36
    
var y = new { x.name, x.age, height = 1.9 }; –  Onots Mar 8 '12 at 14:37
    
Might want to see add-properties-to-an-object-with-reflection-in-c –  nawfal Jun 28 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, this is absolutely not possible. Anonymous types are immutable, and defined exactly by the names and types of their properties and the order that they appear. Adding a new property is a different type.

The best that you can do within anonymous types is create an instance of a different anonymous type:

var y = new { name = x.name, age = x.age, height = 1.9 };

(Note that the name = and age = are not necessary; the compiler will infer them for you.)

But really it sounds like you want either dynamic, or a property bag like a Dictionary<string, object> if you're not in .NET 4.0.

Or maybe, just maybe, a concrete type like this:

public class Person {
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public decimal? Height { get; set; }
}

Note that height is nullable.

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Why not just create a new anonymous type?

var x = new { name = "name", age = 22 };
var y = new { x.name, x.age, height = 1.9 };
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Maybe an ExpandoObject could be usable?

dynamic x = new ExpandoObject();
x.name = "name";
x.age = "22";
x.height = 1.9;
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