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I'm looking for a C# integral data type that can hold 32 bit signed values on 32-bit machines and 64-bit signed values on 64-bit machines.
The reason for this is a P/Invoke call to a C function that receives a ssize_t parameter.
I know I could work with preprocessor directives to "DllImport" this function in different ways for different machines (with ints for 32-bit machines and longs for 64-bit), but that would require me to build and ship for different targets, which is very undesirable.

Any other solutions to this problem are very welcome, of course :D

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@Marcelo - I think your looking for IntPtr –  Ramhound Mar 8 '12 at 14:52
    
The other simple solution is to always send your C code a 64-bit value. You don't seem to indicate the reason this cannot be done. –  Ramhound Mar 8 '12 at 14:56
    
@Anarc Perhaps the OP didn't fancy accepting answers for the sake of it. –  Grant Thomas Mar 8 '12 at 15:01
    
ssize_t is not part of the C standard, but comes with POSIX. For C you have intptr_t or better uintptr_t that is an integer type that can hold the same information as a pointer. It must not necessarily exist (if there is no such type on a target machine) but usually it does. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 8 '12 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the IntPtr type:

The IntPtr type is designed to be an integer whose size is platform-specific. That is, an instance of this type is expected to be 32-bits on 32-bit hardware and operating systems, and 64-bits on 64-bit hardware and operating systems.

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gosh.. never thought of IntPtr as simply holding a number, my mind always looked at it as a pointer, and for that I always thought it was unsigned.. nailed it! –  Marcelo Zabani Mar 8 '12 at 14:56
    
IntPtr is signed. If you need an unsigned type, you can use UIntPtr. –  dtb Mar 8 '12 at 14:59
    
@dtb - He indicates he is looking to store signed integers. There is also a "gotcha" when dealing with the UIntPtr based on some quick reading I did. –  Ramhound Mar 8 '12 at 15:15

I'm looking for a C# integral data type that can hold 32 bit signed values on 32-bit machines and 64-bit signed values on 64-bit machines.

You are looking for IntPtr.

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