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Is there a built-in Perl variable that keeps track of how many records have been read in a while loop?

For example, suppose I do this:

my $count;
while (<>) {
 $count++;
}
print $count;

Is there a way to do this without defining $count? That is, is there already some variable that contains this information?

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What's wrong with current approach? It's multipurpose. For counting number of lines in file, there are many utilities. –  aartist Mar 8 '12 at 16:34
    
Why don't you want to define $count? –  brian d foy Mar 8 '12 at 20:07
    
@briandfoy - there's no programming reason, other than just an effort to write concise code. I assumed there must be something like $. but didn't know what it was called. –  itzy Mar 8 '12 at 22:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

$. will tell you the current line number for the current file being read.

Note that the variable resets on a close() call to the filehandle, so if the old file handle isn't closed when you start reading from a new one then the variable will keep incrementing even across files. However, if the filehandle is closed you'll have it reset to 0. For example, the code in your example and this code will continuously count across files being read:

foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { 
    open(I, $arg);
    while(<I>) { 
         print $.,"\n"; 
    }
}

But if you close the filehandle at any point before the next open call:

foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { 
    open(I, $arg);
    while(<I>) { 
         print $.,"\n"; 
    }
    close(I);  # NEW LINE
}

then it'll reset $. to zero again and you'll get unique counts per file.

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2  
$. counts across files when using <>, it will not reset, see perldoc perlvar. –  Hasturkun Mar 8 '12 at 14:53
    
Whoops, you're right. Though when I read it a second ago it was less than clear about that. –  Wes Hardaker Mar 8 '12 at 14:59
    
Greatly expanded the text to reflect open/close issues. –  Wes Hardaker Mar 8 '12 at 15:04

You can use a simple command line script, too:

perl -ne 'if (eof) {printf "%6d %s\n",$.,$ARGV;close @ARGV}' file1 file2 file3
    10 file1
 13921 file2
    12 file3
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There is no automatic loop counter in Perl. There are counters to count the current line number in a filehandle (see Wes Hardaker).

The loopcounter would be very complex (how to handle a loop inside a loop?).

So, back to the old $count++ :)

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