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I am writing a card game where the play goes around the circle of players (like most card games). The play can go either direction left or right and is assigned to a boolean. True for play to the right, false to play to the left. I have all my player objects in an arraylist so when I need to find the next player that will play I get the current player and assign the next player as the next player in the list. If the current player is the last player in the list though I will get an exception saying out of bounds... unless I catch the exception and assign the next player as the first player in the list. Is this an ok way of doing it? I have no other idea about how to go around a list in a circle. Thanks.

   public AbstractPlayergetNextPlayerToPlay(AbstractPlayer currentPlayer,             
   ArrayList<AbstractPlayer> players, boolean directionOfPlay){

    AbstractPlayer nextPlayerToPlay = null;

    //if the direction of play is forwards (true)
    if(directionOfPlay){
        for(int i=0;i<players.size();i++){
            try{
            if(players.get(i).equals(currentPlayer)){
                nextPlayerToPlay = players.get(i+1);
            }
            }catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){
                nextPlayerToPlay = players.get(0);//first player in the list
            }
        }
    }
    else{
        //if the direction of play is backwards (false)
        for(int i=players.size();i>0;i--){
            try{
            if(players.get(i).equals(currentPlayer)){
                nextPlayerToPlay = players.get(i-1);
            }
            }catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){
                nextPlayerToPlay = players.get(players.size());//last player in list  T
            }
        }
    }

    return nextPlayerToPlay;

}
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Use the modulus operator eg. (i + 1) % players.size() –  BeRecursive Mar 8 '12 at 15:15
    
I would never catch an exception when using logic is an option. –  John McDonald Mar 8 '12 at 17:24

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this, should handle both back and forwards

int currentPlayerIndex = players.indexOf(currentPlayer);
int nextPlayerIndex = currentPlayerIndex + (direction0fPlay ? 1 : -1);

// Ensure index is in array
nextPlayerIndex = (nextPlayerIndex + players.size()) % players.size();

return players.get(nextPlayerIndex);
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Ill give that ago, I never would have thought about the modulus operator! Thank you and the rest of the guys who replied. –  Alan Smith Mar 8 '12 at 16:56

Two things,
One:

for(int i=players.size();i>0;i--){

will definetly generate an exception during forst iteration when you do players.get(i), when iterating reverse: you should start from players.size()-1. You also might want to iterate i>=0, [but then you are again prone to get(-1)]

Two: exceptions are slow [relatively], and though it is possible - it usually advised to use logical operations to avoid this behavior.
You can use i % size [cache int size = players.size() before iterating] instead, note that it will not work for get(-1), you will have to do some [very litle] extra work there. for example, get((i+1+size) % size) and get((i-1+size) % size) will always work if -size < i < size

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Why don't you try

int playerIndex = 0;
while(true) {
    playerIndex++;
    if (playerIndex == players.size()) {
        playerIndex = 0;
    }

    [do your stuff with the player here]

}

This way you increment the player index until you reach the the end of the array. You reset the index to 0 then.

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I would recommend seeing if a Linked List would fit your needs. Specifically read up on circular linked lists and doubly linked lists. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_list

In essence, a linked list keeps track of a set of items in a given order. You start at the head node, the head node points to the next, which points to the next, which points to the next, etc.

In a circular linked list the last node points to the first node completing the circle. In a doubly linked list nodes point to the previous node as well as the next node. This solves the problem of going in reverse as well as dealing with the last player in the list.

Generally a linked list gets bashed for taking a long time to search for a specific node but you could probably make things more efficient by updating the reference to the head node to always be the current player instead of having a static starting point, or something similar that fits the logic of your game.

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Change this

nextPlayerToPlay = players.get(i+1);

to this

nextPlayerToPlay = players.get((i+1) % players.size());

This wraps the index back round to 0 when the last player is reached, and is much more efficient and elegant than throwing and catching an exception.

You can do something similar for the other direction.

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it fails for the backward iteration, 0-1 % 7 == -1 –  amit Mar 8 '12 at 15:23

For the upper limit, the module operator % is your friend.

nextPlayerToPlay = players.get((i+1)%players.size()); 

(You might want to cache players.size() in a variable)

For the lower limit, is it so hard to check the value?

nextPlayerToPlay = players.get(i > 0 ? players.get(i-1): players.get(players.size()-1)); 
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Use the modulus operator eg. (i + 1 + players.size()) % players.size()

So if you had 6 players:

(6 + 1 + 7) % 7 = 0

Which will go back to the first player

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it fails for the backward iteration, 0-1 % 7 == -1 –  amit Mar 8 '12 at 15:22
    
Sorry forgot Java doesn't have a true modulus operator - fixed now –  BeRecursive Mar 8 '12 at 15:28

you can represent the circle of players on a bidirectional set of nodes connected in a circle and simply ask the node (which represents the player) for the player next depending on the direction. You would avoid the exception handling and the calculus all together.

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