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When I try and compile this code (VS2010) I am getting the following error: error C3499: a lambda that has been specified to have a void return type cannot return a value

void DataFile::removeComments()
{
  string::const_iterator start, end;
  boost::regex expression("^\\s?#");
  boost::match_results<std::string::const_iterator> what;
  boost::match_flag_type flags = boost::match_default;
  // Look for lines that either start with a hash (#)
  // or have nothing but white-space preceeding the hash symbol
  remove_if(rawLines.begin(), rawLines.end(), [&expression, &start, &end, &what, &flags](const string& line)
  {
    start = line.begin();
    end = line.end();
    bool temp = boost::regex_search(start, end, what, expression, flags);
    return temp;
  });
}

How did I specify that the lambda has a 'void' return type. More-over, how do I specify that the lambda has 'bool' return type?

UPDATE

The following compiles. Can someone please tell me why that compiles and the other does not?

void DataFile::removeComments()
{
  boost::regex expression("^(\\s+)?#");
  boost::match_results<std::string::const_iterator> what;
  boost::match_flag_type flags = boost::match_default;
  // Look for lines that either start with a hash (#)
  // or have nothing but white-space preceeding the hash symbol
  rawLines.erase(remove_if(rawLines.begin(), rawLines.end(), [&expression, &what, &flags](const string& line)
  { return boost::regex_search(line.begin(), line.end(), what, expression, flags); }));
}
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1  
You can explicitly specify it with ->, e.g. [&](double d) -> double { //... –  Flexo Mar 8 '12 at 15:26
2  
I'd advise you to just implicitly capture the variables you need (only [&]...), as what you currently have is needlessly verbose. –  Xeo Mar 8 '12 at 23:32
    
@Xeo can you tell me why its verbose? I need what, expression and flags in the lambda and that is what I have captured. What mroe could I cut out? –  Ryan Mar 12 '12 at 18:32
1  
[&expression, &start, &end, &what, &flags]... (yours) vs [&]... (mine). Now tell me whose is more verbose. ;) [&] tells the lambda to capture everything that you use inside the lambda body, by reference. It's called a "capture default". The other one is [=] and will capture by copy. –  Xeo Mar 12 '12 at 19:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 37 down vote accepted

You can explicitly specify the return type of a lambda by using -> Type after the arguments list:

[]() -> Type { }

However, if a lambda has one statement and that statement is a return statement (and it returns an expression), the compiler can deduce the return type from the type of that one returned expression. You have multiple statements in your lambda, so it doesn't deduce the type.

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3  
the compiler can do that, but the standard forbids it to do that. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 8 '12 at 15:34
4  
-1: This is not a compiler bug. The standard is very clear on this: section 5.1.2, paragraph 4 lays out how the deduction is made and under what conditions it is. –  Nicol Bolas Mar 8 '12 at 17:20
2  
@NicolBolas fixed. –  Seth Carnegie Mar 8 '12 at 23:04
    
While it is not allowed according to the latest draft I could find it looks like it is actually allowed in the final specs going by the comment for this patch gcc.gnu.org/ml/gcc-patches/2011-08/msg01901.html. Anyone has the final spec to verify? –  Eelke Aug 1 '13 at 8:02

The return type of a lambda can be deduced, but only when there is exactly one statement, and that statement is a return statement that returns an expression (an initializer list is not an expression, for example). If you have a multi-statement lambda, then the return type is assumed to be void.

Therefore, you should do this:

  remove_if(rawLines.begin(), rawLines.end(), [&expression, &start, &end, &what, &flags](const string& line) -> bool
  {
    start = line.begin();
    end = line.end();
    bool temp = boost::regex_search(start, end, what, expression, flags);
    return temp;
  }

But really, your second expression is a lot more readable.

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You can have more than one statement when still return:

[]() -> your_type {return (
        your_statement,
        even_more_statement = just_add_comma,
        return_value);}

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/operators/#comma

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