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I am trying to use EF code-first to delete a db record (deleteMe) and it's children (deleteMe.Prices).

foreach (var deleteMe in deleteThese)
{ 
   // Delete validation
   if(CanDeleteItem(deleteMe.ItemId))
   {
      db.Entry(deleteMe).State = EntityState.Deleted;

      foreach (var item in deleteMe.Prices)
      {
         db.Entry(item).State = EntityState.Deleted; // cascade delete
      }
   }
}
db.SaveChanges();

However, Entity Framework seems to be unable to track the fact that the child records should be deleted before the parent. I get the error:

The DELETE statement conflicted with the REFERENCE constraint "ItemPrice_Item".
The conflict occurred in database "DEVDB", table "dbo.ItemPrices", column 'Item_ItemId'.
The statement has been terminated.

How would I execute this delete in EF?

share|improve this question
    
Please update with "deleteMe's Parent" deletion line, so we can see the entire process –  Davi Fiamenghi Mar 8 '12 at 15:50
    
deleteMe is the parent. deleteMe.Prices are the children. I'm sorry for not making that clearer in my question. –  quakkels Mar 8 '12 at 15:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I ended up finding a quick line that'd do it for me:

foreach (var deleteMe in deleteThese)
{ 
   // Delete validation
   if(CanDeleteItem(deleteMe.ItemId))
   {
      ///
      deleteMe.Prices.ToList().ForEach(p => db.ItemPrices.Remove(p));
      ///

      db.Entry(deleteMe).State = EntityState.Deleted;
   }
}
db.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer

Cascade delete in EF is dependent on cascade delete configured in relation in the database so if you don't have cascade delete configured in the database you must first load all item prices to your application and mark them as deleted.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm nervous about changing the db configuration on this project as it is nearly completed and this was supposed to be a quick bug fix. I don't know if I turn on cascade delete in the database if that would result in unexpected behavior in other areas of the project. –  quakkels Mar 8 '12 at 16:01
    
Then just set your code to delete the child items first before the parent. –  DOTang Mar 8 '12 at 16:02

Well the most easiest solution would be to iterate through prices first and call save changes, then set the entry to delete for deleteMe and call save changes again, but have you checked out this: Entity framework code first delete with cascade? It seems to be what you want.

Curious though also why you just aren't removing the entities from the context to delete but instead setting the entry state?

Another option is to set cascade delete http://blogs.msdn.com/b/alexj/archive/2009/08/19/tip-33-how-cascade-delete-really-works-in-ef.aspx

Do something like this (not tested but hopefully you get the jist):

using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope())
{    
    foreach (var deleteMe in deleteThese)
    { 
   // Delete validation
      if(CanDeleteItem(deleteMe.ItemId))
      {

         foreach (var item in deleteMe.Prices)
         {
            db.Entry(item).State = EntityState.Deleted; // cascade delete
         }
         db.SaveChanges();

         db.Entry(deleteMe).State = EntityState.Deleted;


     }
   }
   db.SaveChanges();
   scope.Complete();
}     

Additionally you could call:

db.Prices.Remove(item);

and

db.DeleteMes.Remove(deleteMe);

instead of setting the entry state. Not sure if there is a difference behind the scenes between the two though.

share|improve this answer
    
For the first option it's good to use TransactionScope –  Davi Fiamenghi Mar 8 '12 at 16:03
    
Both of these solutions look like they need cascade delete to be configured on the db. How would I delete manually in code? –  quakkels Mar 8 '12 at 16:05
    
Good point: See example here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… put both deletes into a scope. –  DOTang Mar 8 '12 at 16:06
    
Thanks for the code examples. I'll check these out. –  quakkels Mar 8 '12 at 23:13

Cascade delete in Entity framework is tricky thing, as you need to be sure about deletion entity object graph.It is better to always write a integration test for these cascade deletes.

If you try to delete parent entity in EF, it will try to execute delete statements for any child entities in current dbcontext. As a result, it will not initialize any child entities which have not been loaded. This will lead to RDBMS runtime error which violate the foreign key constraint. To be in safe side ensure all dependent entities loaded to current dbcontext before deleting.

share|improve this answer
    
Great point marvelTracker - I've posted some further details on another post about ensuring these are loaded. Interestingly I didn't turn on Cascade Delete but because of the relationship of the tables (share a primary key) it worked as long as the objects are loaded: stackoverflow.com/questions/2416478/… –  The Coder Aug 5 '12 at 23:31

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