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I am trying to figure out something with c# code, and I'm not 100% sure if it is possible, but I am trying to implement search functionality for several classes which is streamlined and overall easy to develop for. Right now I have the following code:

[DataContract(IsReference = true), Serializable]
public class ClassSearch
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public object Value { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("{0} = {1}", Name, Value);
    }

    ... // additional logic
}

However, I would like to include strong typing for the object value so that it only can be set to the property that is passed in, I guess like similar (hypothetical, not sure if this would work)

[DataContract(IsReference = true), Serializable]
public class ClassSearch<TProperty>
{
    [DataMember]
    public TProperty Property {get; set; }


    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("{0} = '{1}'", Property.Name, Property);
    }

    ... // additional logic
}

public class MainClass
{
    public void Execute()
    {
        SomeClass someClass = new Class{
            Property = "Value";
        };

        ClassSearch search = new ClassSearch<SomeClass.Property>{
            Property = someClass.Property
        };

        var retString = search.ToString(); // Returns "Property = 'Value'"
    }
}
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Depending on how you plan to expose your wcf endpoint you may have issues with generics, case in point being basicHttpBinding will not be able to cater for ClassSearch<Class1> and ClassSearch<Class2> being defined in the same service. –  Trevor Pilley Mar 8 '12 at 15:47
    
I don't understand what you want to obtain. A helper class that can search the properties names and their values of any class and that can print them? You could use reflection. An abstract class or interface ISearchable that makes a class searchable? –  vulkanino Mar 8 '12 at 15:49
    
Oh sorry, ignore the wcf tags. –  Greg Reese Mar 8 '12 at 15:59
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2 Answers

It seems you are trying to create a WCF service to be able to pass any type you like.

First of all, this is not WSDL-friendly. All WCF services needs to be able to be exposed in WSDL. WSDL is all about well-defined contracts hence the types need be all defined. So that generic approach would not work - mainly because of WSDL. Having said that, you still can use generics but then you have to use KnownType and actually define all the types possible - which for me defeats the object.

Yet, one thing you can do is to serialize the object yourself and pass around with its type name across the wire. On the other side, you can pick it up deserialize.

So something along the line of:

// NOTE: Not meant for production!
[DataContract]
public class GenericWcfPayload
{
   [DataMember]
   public byte[] Payload {get; set;}

   [DataMember]
   public string TypeName {get; set;}
}
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If there are no easier answers I would try it with this one.
You could use expressions like so:

// Sample object with a property. 
SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass{Property = "Value"};

// Create the member expression.
Expression<Func<object /*prop owner object*/, object/*prop value*/>> e =
    owner => ((SomeClass)owner).Property;

// Get property name by analyzing expression.
string propName = ((MemberExpression)e.Body).Member.Name;

// Get property value by compiling and running expression.
object propValue = e.Compile().Invoke(someClass);

You hand over your property by the member expression owner => ((SomeClass)owner).Property. This expression contains both information you need: property name and property value. The last two lines show you how to get name and value.


Following a larger example:

class MainClass
{
  public static void Execute()
  {
    SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass{
        Property = "Value"
    };


    var search = new ClassSearch(s => ((SomeClass)s).Property);

    Console.Out.WriteLine("{0} = '{1}'", search.Property.Name, search.Property.GetValue(someClass));
  }
}

class Reflector
{
  public static string GetPropertyName(Expression<Func<object, object>> e)
  {
    if (e.Body.NodeType != ExpressionType.MemberAccess)
    {
      throw new ArgumentException("Wrong expression!");
    }

    MemberExpression me = ((MemberExpression) e.Body);

    return me.Member.Name;
  }
}

class ClassSearch
{
  public ClassSearch(Expression<Func<object, object>> e)
  {
    Property = new PropertyNameAndValue(e);
  }

  public PropertyNameAndValue Property { get; private set; }


  public override string ToString()
  {
    return String.Format("{0} = '{1}'", Property.Name, Property);
  }
}

class PropertyNameAndValue
{
  private readonly Func<object, object> _func;

  public PropertyNameAndValue(Expression<Func<object, object>> e)
  {
    _func = e.Compile();
    Name = Reflector.GetPropertyName(e);
  }

  public object GetValue(object propOwner)
  {
    return _func.Invoke(propOwner);
  }

  public string Name { get; private set; }
}


class SomeClass
{
  public string Property { get; set; }
}

The main part of that example is the method Reflector.GetPropertyName(...) that returns the name of a property within an expression. I.e. Reflector.GetPropertyName(s => ((SomeClass)s).Property) would return "Property".

The advantage is: This is type-safe because in new ClassSearch(s => s.Property) compiling would end with an error if SomeClass would not have a property 'Property'.

The disadvantage is: This is not type-safe because if you write e.g. new ClassSearch(s => s.Method()) and there would be a method 'Method' then there would be no compile error but a runtime error.

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