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There is a nice class Enum from enum, but it only works for strings. I'm currently using:

    for index in range(len(objects)):
        # do something with index and objects[index]

I guess it's not the optimal solution due to the premature use of len. How is it possible to do it more efficiently?

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is the pythonic way to write this loop:

for index, obj in enumerate(objects):
  # Use index, obj.

enumerate works on any sequence regardless of the types of its elements. It is a builtin function.

Edit:

After running some timeit tests using Python 2.5, I found enumerate to be slightly slower:

>>> timeit.Timer('for i in xrange(len(seq)): x = i + seq[i]', 'seq = range(100)').timeit()
10.322299003601074
>>> timeit.Timer('for i, e in enumerate(seq): x = i + e', 'seq = range(100)').timeit()
11.850601196289062
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Is it more efficient? – Bastien Léonard Jun 7 '09 at 15:52
    
@Bastien - After some timeit tests, I found enumerate to be slightly slower than the code in the question. I will update my answer. – Ayman Hourieh Jun 7 '09 at 16:15
    
in py3k results are quite opposite: range version is 3 times slower than enumerate version. – SilentGhost Jun 7 '09 at 16:27
1  
@SilentGhost - you probably forgot to change range(100) to list(range(100)). enumerate() is slightly faster on python 3.0 but only by ~4%, not 3x. – Ivan Baldin Jun 7 '09 at 16:40
    
@SilentGhost - Thanks for testing. I ran my tests in Python 2.5 (edited the answer to reflect this). I don't have access to Python 3.0 at the moment so I cannot try. – Ayman Hourieh Jun 7 '09 at 16:41

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