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Suppose I have two C++ classes:

class A
{
public:
  A() { fn(); }

  virtual void fn() { _n = 1; }
  int getn() { return _n; }

protected:
  int _n;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
  B() : A() {}

  virtual void fn() { _n = 2; }
};

If I write the following code:

main()
{
  B b;
  int n = b.getn();
}

One might expect that n is set to 2.

It turns out that n is set to 1. Why?

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4  
I'm asking and answering my own question because I want to get the explanation for this bit of C++ esoterica into Stack Overflow. A version of this issue has struck our development team twice, so I'm guessing this info might be of use to someone out there. Please write out an answer if you can explain it in a different/better way... –  David Coufal Jun 7 '09 at 15:46
1  
There are any number of things wrong with this code. A hint - compile before posting here. –  anon Jun 7 '09 at 15:51
2  
I'm wondering why this got down voted? When I first learned C++ this really confused me. +1 –  Zifre Jun 7 '09 at 15:59
1  
Have you tried compiling the code? –  anon Jun 7 '09 at 16:01
1  
Isn't this an exact duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/496440/… ? –  Lorenzo Apr 17 '12 at 12:34

9 Answers 9

up vote 85 down vote accepted

Calling virtual functions from a constructor or destructor is dangerous and should be avoided whenever possible. All C++ implementations should call the version of the function defined at the level of the hierarchy in the current constructor and no further.

The C++ FAQ Lite covers this in section 23.7 in pretty good detail. I suggest reading that (and the rest of the FAQ) for a followup.

EDIT Corrected Most to All (thanks litb)

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I wish I could upvote this 100 times. Doing such things usually indicates flawed design. –  Kevin Jun 7 '09 at 16:03
17  
Not most C++ implementations, but all C++ implementations have to call the current class's version. If some don't, then those have a bug :). I still agree with you that it's bad to call a virtual function from a base class - but semantics are precisely defined. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 7 '09 at 16:19
1  
@litb, thanks for the clarification (updated). –  JaredPar Jun 7 '09 at 16:33
1  
And the following FAQ page discusses exactly how to work around it. –  Ciro Santilli Apr 9 '14 at 7:54
1  
Why is calling virtual functions from destructor dangerous? Isn't the object still complete when destructor runs, and only destroyed after the destructor finishes? –  Siyuan Ren Sep 11 '14 at 12:39

Calling a polymorphic function from a constructor is a recipe for disaster in most OO languages. Different languages will perform differently when this situation is encountered.

The basic problem is that in all languages the Base type(s) must be constructed previous to the Derived type. Now, the problem is what does it mean to call a polymorphic method from the constructor. What do you expect it to behave like? There are two approaches: call the method at the Base level (C++ style) or call the polymorphic method on an unconstructed object at the bottom of the hierarchy (Java way).

In C++ the Base class will build its version of the virtual method table prior to entering its own construction. At this point a call to the virtual method will end up calling the Base version of the method or producing a pure virtual method called in case it has no implementation at that level of the hierarchy. After the Base has been fully constructed, the compiler will start building the Derived class, and it will override the method pointers to point to the implementations in the next level of the hierarchy.

class Base {
public:
   Base() { f(); }
   virtual void f() { std::cout << "Base" << std::endl; } 
};
class Derived : public Base
{
public:
   Derived() : Base() {}
   virtual void f() { std::cout << "Derived" << std::endl; }
};
int main() {
   Derived d;
}
// outputs: "Base" as the vtable still points to Base::f() when Base::Base() is run

In Java, the compiler will build the virtual table equivalent at the very first step of construction, prior to entering the Base constructor or Derived constructor. The implications are different (and to my likings more dangerous). If the base class constructor calls a method that is overriden in the derived class the call will actually be handled at the derived level calling a method on an unconstructed object, yielding unexpected results. All attributes of the derived class that are initialized inside the constructor block are yet uninitialized, including 'final' attributes. Elements that have a default value defined at the class level will have that value.

public class Base {
   public Base() { polymorphic(); }
   public void polymorphic() { 
      System.out.println( "Base" );
   }
}
public class Derived extends Base
{
   final int x;
   public Derived( int value ) {
      x = value;
      polymorphic();
   }
   public void polymorphic() {
      System.out.println( "Derived: " + x ); 
   }
   public static void main( String args[] ) {
      Derived d = new Derived( 5 );
   }
}
// outputs: Derived 0
//          Derived 5
// ... so much for final attributes never changing :P

As you see, calling a polymorphic (virtual in C++ terminology) methods is a common source of errors. In C++, at least you have the guarantee that it will never call a method on a yet unconstructed object...

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Good job explaining why the alternative is (also) are error-prone. –  DS. Sep 21 '12 at 15:26
    
"If the base class constructor calls a method that is overriden in the derived class the call will actually be handled at the derived level calling a method on an unconstructed object..." How so if base is already initialized. There is no possiblity unless you explicilty call "init" before initializing other members. –  Arek Bal Oct 1 '13 at 19:27

The reason is that C++ objects are constructed like onions, from the inside out. Super-classes are constructed before derived classes. So, before a B can be made, an A must be made. When A's constructor is called, it's not a B yet, so the virtual function table still has the entry for A's copy of fn().

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9  
C++ does not normally use the term "super class" - it prefers "base class". –  anon Jun 7 '09 at 15:48
    
That is the same in most OO languages: you cannot possibly build a derived object without the base part being already constructed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 7 '09 at 16:12

The C++ FAQ Lite Covers this pretty well:

Essentially, during the call to the base classes constructor, the object is not yet of the derived type and thus the base type's implementation of the virtual function is called and not the derived type's.

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One solution to your problem is using factory methods to create your object.

  • Define a common base class for your class hierarchy containing a virtual method afterConstruction():
class Object
{
public:
  virtual void afterConstruction() {}
  // ...
};
  • Define a factory method:
template< class C >
C* factoryNew()
{
  C* pObject = new C();
  pObject->afterConstruction();

  return pObject;
}
  • Use it like this:
class MyClass : public Object 
{
public:
  virtual void afterConstruction()
  {
    // do something.
  }
  // ...
};

MyClass* pMyObject = factoryNew();

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@meowsqueak Thanks for the formatting improvement! –  Tobias Aug 16 '12 at 9:44

Do you know the crash error from Windows explorer?! "Pure virtual function call ..."
Same problem ...

class AbstractClass 
{
public:
    AbstractClass( ){
        //if you call pureVitualFunction I will crash...
    }
    virtual void pureVitualFunction() = 0;
};

Because there is no implemetation for the function pureVitualFunction() and the function is called in the constructor the program will crash.

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I am not seeing the importance of the virtual key word here. b is a static-typed variable, and its type is determined by compiler at compile time. The function calls would not reference the vtable. When b is constructed, its parent class's constructor is called, which is why the value of _n is set to 1.

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The vtables are created by the compiler. A class object has a pointer to its vtable. When it starts life, that vtable pointer points to the vtable of the base class. At the end of the constructor code, the compiler generates code to re-point the vtable pointer to the actual vtable for the class. This ensures that constructor code that calls virtual functions calls the base class implementations of those functions, not the override in the class.

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During the object's constructor call the virtual function pointer table is not completely built. Doing this will usually not give you the behavior you expect. Calling a virtual function in this situation may work but is not guaranteed and should be avoided to be portable and follow the C++ standard.

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2  
"Calling a virtual function in this situation may work but is not guaranteed" That is not correct. The behaviour is guaranteed. –  curiousguy Dec 24 '11 at 2:16

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