Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to be able to get a list of types by their common name from a freebase ID

{
  "id":    "/m/02mjmr", #obama
  "type":[]
}​

How can I return the names of the types instead of their IDs? The above returns

0: "/common/topic"xp
1: "/people/person"xp
2: "/user/robert/default_domain/presidential_candidate"xp
3: "/book/author"xp
4: "/award/award_winner"xp
5: "/book/book_subject"xp
6: "/user/robert/x2008_presidential_election/candidate"xp
7: "/government/politician"xp
8: "/organization/organization_member"xp
9: "/user/robert/default_domain/my_favorite_things"xp

And lastly, how could I sort them by count? or by notability possibly?

Ie,

President
Nobel Prize Winner
Author
Person

etc?

Possibly something similar to the notable types API, but it looks like it's going away?

http://wiki.freebase.com/wiki/Notable_types_API

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can get names and instance counts with

{
  "id": "/m/02mjmr",
  "type": [{
    "name":          null,
    "id":null,
    "/type/type/domain":{"key":[{"namespace":"/","limit":0}],"id":null}
    "/freebase/type_profile/instance_count": null,
    "sort":"/freebase/type_profile/instance_count"
  }]
}​

One definition of "notable" is low frequency, so you could just invert your instance count sort to get notability. Limiting this to types in the Freebase "commons" would exclude noisy user types. One way to identify commons types is to look for /type/type/domain property values which are in the root namespace (ie a single path segment like /government)

For your example, the lowest frequency commons types are:

 43 /government/us_president     US President    /government 
 51 /people/appointer    Appointer   /people  
 73 /architecture/building_occupant  Building Occupant   /architecture 
204 /government/political_appointer  Political Appointer     /government
230 /book/poem_character     Poem character  /book  
254 /event/public_speaker    Public speaker  /event

You could refine the filtering further by blacklisting the types that you think are not notable for your application. There are currently 2134 commons types and a bunch of those are primitive data types or things for system usage, so it wouldn't take you long to go through and hand curate the entire list.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to get a list notable types for a tag suggestion function on a form. Low frequency can also mean it's an obscure tag also. How can I throw out those and still keep the most notable? –  ere Mar 9 '12 at 7:30
    
I've updated the query and the description to show how you could filter out noisy user-defined types. –  Tom Morris Mar 9 '12 at 15:53
    
Thats perfect thanks! –  ere Mar 9 '12 at 16:28

You might also be interested in looking at the Freebase Search API which returns one or more notable types with each result. You can search for a specific topic by MID like this:

https://www.googleapis.com/freebase/v1/search?query=/m/02mjmr&indent=true

share|improve this answer
    
I'd love to use the Search API for this, as I'm sure the algorithm finding most notable is better than anything I'll make, but it usually only throws out one notable type, and sometimes none at all. In this case just "US President." ;-( –  ere Mar 9 '12 at 7:32
    
Although Google has never documented how they select the notable types, I suspect it's not far off from what I describe in my reply. Note that any algorithm has the potential to return an empty set unless it's tuned to allow very non-notable results through. –  Tom Morris Mar 9 '12 at 15:56
    
The notable types algorithm started with this app (types.namesbc.user.dev.freebaseapps.com/…) by Bryan Culbertson which looks at the number of instances like Tom's example. –  Shawn Simister Mar 9 '12 at 19:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.