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Is it possible to tell g++ to use the FOO& operator when constructing the FOO object ?

struct FOO {

        FOO( FOO & foo ) { // non-const copy constructor
        }

        operator FOO&() {

                return *this;
        }

        FOO( int i ) {
        }
};


int main() {

        FOO a(FOO(5));
}

I currently get the following error:

In function int main():
  error: no matching function for call to FOO::FOO(FOO)
  note: candidates are: FOO::FOO(int)
  note:                 FOO::FOO(FOO&)

-- edit --

Note that I try to setup an object that can exchange the ownership of a resource.
Calling FOO foo1(foo) make foo to lose the ownership of the resource, this mean that foo cannot be const.
Also note that I want to avoid smart-pointer mechanism.

share|improve this question
    
Compiles in MSVS08. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 8 '12 at 17:42
2  
@LuchianGrigore: because it has an "extension" that allows it to bind non-const references to temporaries. Afaik you can disable that (maybe only in 10, dunno). –  PlasmaHH Mar 9 '12 at 15:17
3  
Why would you even want to do that? In C++ non-const references can not bind to temporaries, there is almost never a need for non-const copy ctors, especially now that we have move ctors. –  PlasmaHH Mar 9 '12 at 15:18
    
@PlasmaHH: That would be /Za (disable language extensions). –  Xeo Mar 9 '12 at 15:19
1  
I think you need to look up the mutable keyword. –  Mike DeSimone Mar 9 '12 at 15:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your conversion operator will never be picked up.

§12.3.2 [class.conv.fct] p1

A conversion function is never used to convert a (possibly cv-qualified) object to the (possibly cv-qualified) same object type (or a reference to it), to a (possibly cv-qualified) base class of that type (or a reference to it), or to (possibly cv-qualified) void.

The reason is that the conversions mentioned here (except to cv void) are already done by so-called standard conversions (qualification conversion (adding const or volatile) and identity conversion (binding an object to a reference)) and standard conversions are always preferred to user-defined conversions:

§13.3.3.2 [over.ics.rank] p2

a standard conversion sequence (13.3.3.1.1) is a better conversion sequence than a user-defined conversion sequence [...]


For your specific case, if you want to transfer ownership, do so in C++11 style, with a move constructor.

#include <utility> // move

struct foo{
  int resource;
  foo(int r)
    : resource(r) {}
  foo(foo&& other)
    : resource(other.resource)
  { other.resource = 0; }
};

int main(){
  foo f1(foo(5));
  //foo f2(f1); // error
  foo f3(std::move(f1)); // OK
}

Transferring ownership via non-const copy constructors is a very bad idea, as such a type can never be stored in standard containers, see the ugly std::auto_ptr (replaced by std::unique_ptr in C++11, which has proper move semantics).

share|improve this answer

Note that I try to setup an object that can exchange the ownership of a resource.

Calling FOO foo1(foo) make foo to lose the ownership of the resource, this mean that foo cannot be const.

Also note that I want to avoid smart-pointer mechanism.

So you've got something like:

struct FOO {
        // ...
        SomeType* storage;
        bool owns_storage;
        // ...
        FOO(const FOO& foo): storage(foo.storage), owns_storage(true) {
            foo.owns_storage = false; /* <-- fails to build */ }
        ~FOO() { if(owns_storage) delete storage; }
};

And you need a copy to set owns_storage to false on the const original object. Use the mutable keyword and your problem goes away:

struct FOO {
        // ...
        SomeType* storage;
        mutable bool owns_storage;
        // ...
        FOO(const FOO& foo): storage(foo.storage), owns_storage(true) {
            foo.owns_storage = false; /* builds fine now */ }
        ~FOO() { if(owns_storage) delete storage; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Moving things through copy constructors is always a bad idea, as it will mess up standard containers and algorithms and as such can not be used with those. It's the same underlying problem as if having a non-const copy ctor. –  Xeo Mar 9 '12 at 15:52
1  
Correct, which is why the C++98 standard library recommends swap for such tasks. However, I am trusting that the OP has a Really Good Reason for needing to do this. The source object may need to access the resource even though it is no longer responsible for its release. The resource may well be something that is not memory, such as a socket or file. Also, there is no reason to assume C++11 support is available. The ink on the standard is barely dry. –  Mike DeSimone Mar 9 '12 at 18:17

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