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I'm using a third party javascript that has given me a lot of need for listeners. For instance, when a certain div has been loaded, I want to do something with it. It changes styles of objects as it goes as well so I need to watch for it to have a certain style. I've build functions to act when an id or class exists. Here's the current ID function. As you can see, it uses jQuery.

function whenLoaded(element_id, action) {
    if ($(element_id)) {
        action();
    }
    else {
        setTimeout("whenLoaded('"+element_ids+"',"+action+", '"+stop_on+"')", 500);
    }
}

I really need something that I can give multiple conditions to. For instance:

whenTrue(
    ($('popup') && $('popup').style.width == '500px'), 
    $('popup').style.width = '0'
);

I would expect it to recursively check the conditions (1st param). When those conditions are true, perform the action.

I've been able to accomplish this using eval() but I have been warned not to use it, can't remember why. That being said, I'd like to accomplish this in another way.

eval() solution:

whenTrue(
    "($('popup') && $('popup').style.width == '500px')", 
    "$('popup').style.width = '0'"
);

function whenTrue(condition, action) {
    if (eval(condition)) {
        eval(action);
    }
    else {
        setTimeout("whenTrue('"+condition+"','"+action+"')", 500);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'm not really sure this is really what you want to be doing. Relying on lots of timeout triggers makes the app either slow or unresponsive, makes everything more susceptible to race conditions and adds a significant layer of magic to the code. Can't you can't use a more normal architecture? –  hugomg Mar 8 '12 at 18:31
    
BTW, the usual way to passing conditions (and callbacks) around is to pass them as functions (instead of strings that you need to eval). –  hugomg Mar 8 '12 at 18:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
function conditionListener(callback){
    if(typeof callback !== 'function') return;

    var interval, callback = callback;

    interval = setInterval(function() {
        if(true /* some condition */){
            callback();
            clearInterval(interval);
        }
    }, 500);
}

var listener = new conditionListener(function() {
    /* ... do work ... */
});

http://jsfiddle.net/M26XS/

share|improve this answer

I wrote this function once which looks like it does basically what you would want:

function pollUntilTrue(conditionFunc, afterTrueFunc, timeout) {
    var __xinterval = setInterval(function() {
      var res = conditionFunc();
      if (res === true) {
        clearInterval(__xinterval);
        afterTrueFunc();
      }
    }, timeout);
  }

you would use it with your code like this:

pollUntilTrue(function() {
   return ($('popup') && $('popup').style.width == '500px');
}, 
function() {
  $('popup').style.width = '0';
}, 500);

Adjust the timeout to suite your needs

share|improve this answer

Why don't you just accept a condition and an action? that would make it much simpler.

function whenTrue(condition, action) {     
   if (condition) {         
      action();     
   }     
  else {
         setTimeout("whenTrue('"+condition+"',"+action+", '"+stop_on+"')", 500); 
 }

}

and then you can provide the condition when calling the function, it would look like this:

whenTrue(($('popup') && $('popup').style.width == '500px') &&
          $('popup').style.width === '0', someAction); 
share|improve this answer

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