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I'm trying to write an extension for DropDownListFor:

public static MvcHtmlString DropDownListFor<TModel, TProperty>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper, Expression<Func<TModel, TProperty>> expression, IEnumerable<SelectListItem> selectList, object htmlAttributes, bool enabled)
{
    return htmlHelper.DropDownListFor(expression, selectList, null /* optionLabel */, HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes));
}

What I want to achieve is if enabled is false no change but if enabled is true I want to add @disabled="disabled" to the html attributes before giving them to AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes.

Any ideas on how to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Simple! HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes returns RouteValueDictionary. You can add value to that dictionary, you do not need to add property to anonymous object.

public static MvcHtmlString DropDownListFor<TModel, TProperty>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper, Expression<Func<TModel, TProperty>> expression, IEnumerable<SelectListItem> selectList, object htmlAttributes, bool enabled)
{
    var attrs = HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes);
    if (!enabled)
    {
        attrs.Add("disabled", "disabled");
    }
    return htmlHelper.DropDownListFor(expression, selectList, null /* optionLabel */, attrs);
}
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3  
No need to write a helper, just use the overload that accepts htmlAttributes as Dmitry suggests. –  RickAnd - MSFT Mar 8 '12 at 23:35
2  
@Rick.Anderson-at-Microsoft.com I would not agree. First, the question was about adding attribute, not the possibility to use other methods. And second, creating helper in this case is much more readable then checking enabled condition and then calling correct method overload from view –  archil Mar 9 '12 at 6:10

Solution by archil works. However, for what you are trying to do writing an extension is an overkill.

Just write in your view something like:

@Html.DropDownListFor(m => m.Id, Model.Values, new { disabled = "disabled" })
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Yeah, that works but it's a little more complex because it's not always disabled it depends on a property. I'm not sure how you would write it as you have above for no attribute if enabled equals true but disabled = "disabled" for enabled equals false –  AnonyMouse Mar 9 '12 at 2:47
2  
Yeah, the html specs for disable attribute (same as for readonly) is a disaster. Legally they can only take the name of the attribute itself. However, most browsers are taught to accept anything for these attributes, which is why disabled="false" will result for you in a disabled attribute as well. You can wrap the whole DropDownListFor in the if statement with your property check as a condition. However, I see how it would be a bit of a less code with the extension. –  Dmitry Mar 9 '12 at 17:30

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