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int Solver::negamax(Position* pos,int alpha,int beta, int color, int depth ) {
  if(depth==0 || is_final(pos)){
    return evaluate(pos);
  }
  else{
    vector < Position* > moves = generate_moves(pos->get_board());
    vector < Position* >::iterator move;
    int min = 99999;
    for(move = moves.begin(); move < moves.end(); move++){
      int val = negamax(*move,alpha, beta, -color, depth - 1 );
      if(val <= min){
        min = val;
        delete best;
        best = NULL;
        best = (*move)->get_board();

      }
      else{
        delete *move; //So this isnt cleaning up?
        *move = NULL;
      }
     }
     min = -min;
     return min;
     }

 }

vector < Position* > TakeAwaySolver::generate_moves(Board *brd){
  TakeAwayBoard *board = static_cast<TakeAwayBoard*>(brd);
  vector < Position* > moves;
  if(board->get_data() >= 3){
     TakeAwayBoard *b = new TakeAwayBoard(board->get_data() - 3);
     Position* p = new Position(b);
     moves.push_back(p);
  }
  if(board->get_data() >= 2){
     TakeAwayBoard *b = new TakeAwayBoard(board->get_data() - 2);
     Position* p = new Position(b);
     moves.push_back(p);
  }
  TakeAwayBoard *b = new TakeAwayBoard(board->get_data() - 1);
  Position* p = new Position(b);
  moves.push_back(p);
  return moves;

}

I valgrinded my program and I'm apparently leaking memory. It seems that I'm deleting all unused objects, but perhaps I'm not understanding something. generate_moves() does allocate memory for each of the objects being pushed in. Evaluate returns 1. Does it seem possible that I'm leaking memory in any location?

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1  
Where does valgrind tell you the memory is lost? –  Jan Rüegg Mar 8 '12 at 20:14
3  
You're leaking, because you're using new and delete. You never have to use delete in C++ and you need new only in very specific circumstances, which do not apply to your example. Pass data by value and use standard containers. –  avakar Mar 8 '12 at 20:18
1  
What about TakeAwayBoard *b = new TakeAwayBoard(...)? Do you free *b somewhere, for example in Position::~Position()? I guess we need a little bit more of your code (and an exact/complete valgrind error report). –  Zeta Mar 8 '12 at 20:19
2  
@avakar What? If you need to use new, no matter how specific the circumstances, you'll need to use delete too! –  Mr Lister Mar 8 '12 at 20:23
2  
@MrLister: If you use new then something has to use delete - but that should always be some kind of resource management object, not you. Unless you enjoy debugging memory leaks, of course. –  Mike Seymour Mar 8 '12 at 20:42
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have an if/else in which *move is only deleted in one of the paths. I'd check there.

for(move = moves.begin(); move < moves.end(); move++){
          int val = negamax(*move,alpha, beta, -color, depth - 1 );
          if(val <= min){
            min = val;
            delete best;
            best = NULL;
            best = (*move)->get_board();
                                           //best is deleted, but *move is not
          }
          else{
            delete *move;
            *move = NULL;
          }
         }
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That was it. I forgot to delete the *move pointer, so I just cloned moves board into best and delete move right after. Thanks –  carboncomputed Mar 8 '12 at 20:54
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A std::vector<position *> container will not automatically delete the inserted elements when it is destroyed. Make it a std::vector<x<position *> > where x is some suitable smart pointer template, like auto_ptr.

If you don't want to do that, then the next best thing is to wrap the vector in a class whose destructor iterates over the vector and calls delete on every pointer.

I.e. this is a memory leak:

{
   std::vector<int *> vec;
   vec.push_back(new int[3]);
   // vec goes out of scope
}

Sure, the vector cleans itself up! It deletes its internal array, etc. But it does nothing with the new int[3] that we allocated and put into the vector.

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Would I be able to just use a vector pointer, and delete the vector, instead of wrapping the vector in a class? I feel like the vectors default destructor would already iterate over the elements and delete them. –  carboncomputed Mar 8 '12 at 20:30
    
The vector's default destructor will go over the elements and destroy them. Not delete them. That's a big difference! An object like Position * is a basic C++ type. If we destroy that, nothing happens: it has an empty destructor, so to speak. The only way a deletion happens for a vector element is if it is a class object which has a destructor, and that destructor deletes something. For instance if it is some smart_pointer<Position *> with a smart_pointer<Position *>::~smart_pointer() destructor which deletes the pointer that the smart pointer holds. –  Kaz Mar 8 '12 at 20:31
    
But the iterator is iterating over the elements that I am deleting, and if it's not stored in best, (which I delete later), it is deleted in the else right? –  carboncomputed Mar 8 '12 at 20:33
    
It cleans up the pointer objects... not the pointed-to memory. –  tmpearce Mar 8 '12 at 20:33
1  
You are trying to move the clean-up logic into the algorithm, but then it means that you have to get all your cases right not only from the point of view of the algorithm, but from the point of view of correct memory management. It would be easier to just leave the pointers alone during the algorithm, and clean them up in one fell swoop when the vector is no longer needed, liberating yourself to just getting the algorithm right. Think like a garbage collector. Dilbert's genius garbage collector, that is. :) –  Kaz Mar 8 '12 at 20:55
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It seems to me that you never clear the 'minimum' positions.

You store a pointer to the board in best, and take care to clear that when you replace it with a better minimum, and in case the move isn't a minimum so far, you properly clean it up, but you never clean the actual position pointer in case it's a minimum.

As a side note, this is redundant:

    best = NULL;
    best = (*move)->get_board();
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