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I'm writing a Ruby C Extension where I'm using math.h. It's being compiled on both OSX and Windows. Under Windows I use nmake that comes with Visual Studio Express C++ 2010.

I found that VS didn't include the round() function in their math.h. So I added this to compensate:

static inline double round( double value )
{    
  return floor( value + 0.5 );
}

That off course caused an error when compiling under OSX as round() there is defined. (The actual error I think was that I'd declared mine static after it's already been declared a non-static version.

Regardless, I'd like to avoid redefining the function if it does exist.

At the moment I have this conditional:

#ifdef _WIN32
static inline double round( double value )
{    
  return floor( value + 0.5 );
}
#endif

That worked in my scenario - but it seem a bit generic. I mean, what if I compile with a different compiler under Windows?

So my question is, can I detect if a function is already defined, and then avoid defining it myself?

Or, can I detect specifically the compiler nmake use - cl I think it is?

I'm thinking I'd ideally be able to detect if the function is already defined, as it seem like the most robust method.

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3 Answers 3

That worked in my scenario - but it seem a bit generic. I mean, what if I compile with a different compiler under Windows?

  1. Generic is good.
  2. It doesn't matter what compiler you use; you are simply checking if a symbol is defined. You could define that symbol using any compiler, it doesn't matter. ifdefs are typically how you handle portability issues.
  3. round is defined by the C99 standard. VS does not suppport C99 at this time, that is why it is missing.
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My concern was, that if I for instance updated Visual Studio and math.h then did include round() - then there would be a conflict like under OSX. Which is why I was thinking that checking for the feature instead of the environment was a better idea. It's the line of thinking I have from web-development where you test for features instead of sniffing the user-agent string. –  thomthom Mar 8 '12 at 21:22
    
@thomthom: Yeah, but this aint web development =). This is how you do it in general. Sometimes when you change compilers things break and you need to fix them, but it can be avoided for the most part. In this case, round was added in C99. VS does not support C99, which is why it is not present. –  Ed S. Mar 8 '12 at 21:26
    
GNU's autoconf uses the feature-based approach, #define'ing constants of the form HAVE_feature. For example, you might define HAVE_ROUND. Since it is compiler-dependent in this case, you could do a "-DHAVE_ROUND=0" in your C Preprocessor definitions in your compile command; leave it undefined under compilers that have round(). The wrapper around your round() function would then read #if defined(HAVE_ROUND) && !HAVE_ROUND ... function declaration ... #endif. –  Alex Measday Mar 9 '12 at 5:09
    
I found that Ruby's mkfm utility has a have_func() methods that will check for the existence of specific methods and create create preprocessor constants for it - allowing you to reliably define the function only if it doesn't exist. linuxtopia.org/online_books/programming_books/ruby_tutorial/… –  thomthom Mar 18 '12 at 21:39

What you did is the correct way of dealing with incompatibilities.

You've noticed that this way of dealing with system dependent incompatibilities is 'not generic', but opposite to languages like JAVA that abstracts such issues you have to deal with such things. On the other hand you will always get the best performance that the platform offers.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found that Ruby's mkmf utility has a method have_func that one can use to check for the existence of functions: http://apidock.com/ruby/Object/have_func

I added have_func( 'round', 'math.h' ) to my extconf.rb file which then gave me a HAVE_ROUND preprocessor constant.

Then I could safely define round() myself it it didn't exist:

#ifndef HAVE_ROUND
static inline double round( double value )
{    
  return floor( value + 0.5 );
}
#endif

Worked perfectly! :)

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