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I noticed on fiddler that [RequireHttps] does status code 302 redirects instead of 301. I'm not sure how this makes sense...

If you are saying that a controller [RequireHttps], then you never-ever want people to go visit the Http version of that page. So why isn't a permanent redirect... telling the search engines "please update your links permanantly to the https version of this page".

If this makes sense, and i'm right, is there a way to change it to 301 redirect?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It seems as if the choice to go with 302 over 301 was a little arbitrary to begin with. However, it does not necessarily follow that every URL is going to "have" to utilize the HTTPS scheme. There very well could be a page that allows access from both HTTP or HTTPS even if it may encourage the latter. An implementation where this may occur could have some code wired up to determine whether or not to use HTTPS based on some special criteria.

As a case scenario, take a look at Gmail. Within the settings, one is capable of allowing or disallowing the HTTPS protocol throughout large portions of the application. Which code should be returned then? 301 wouldn't be accurate, as it isn't "permanent"...only a change at the behest of the user. Sadly, 302 isn't quite accurate either because a 302 error implies that there is intent to change the link back at some point in the future (related reference http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec10.html).

Granted, Gmail is a rough example because the portions of the site that allow that option are not typically indexed by a search engine, but the possibility still exists.

And to answer your final question, if you want a different status code in ASP.NET MVC (which I assume you're using from the small syntax example), it is possible to change with a simple, custom attribute:

public class MyRequireHttpsAttribute : RequireHttpsAttribute
{
    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);

        if (!filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsSecureConnection)
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.MovedPermanently;
    }
}

Now all actions that implement the attribute should return a 301 status code when accessed via the HTTP protocol.

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1  
RequireHttps attribute isn't an attribute that leaves any "choice" in the matter. It's basically saying MUST BE HTTPS - HTTP IS WRONG because its impossible to get to the site over HTTP. This is why I feel it really should have been 301 to begin with... but your code is spot-on and I appreciate the discussion. I'll do a little more research before I decide to switch it all over to 301... i'm a bit new to SEO. Thanks! –  Ralph N Mar 10 '12 at 20:46
    
Right, and I do agree with that point on the RequireHttps attribute specifically. I was more trying to get at the larger picture of how it isn't explicitly necessary in a particular application outside the context of a particular framework. Glad the code helped! –  Dulan Mar 10 '12 at 21:50
2  
Unfortunately this didn't work... it still does a 302. I tried messing with it otherways... but I still couldn't override RequireHttps and make it do a 301. Instead, I just created my own [RequireHttpsPerm] and am doing the redirect myself. –  Ralph N Apr 19 '12 at 14:40

Dulan's answer is close, but it does not work, at least with our MVC 4+ solution. But after some trial and error, we did get ours working with 301's instead of 302's. Here is the new class:

public class CustomRequireHttpsAttribute : RequireHttpsAttribute
{
    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        #if !DEBUG
        base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);

        if (!filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsSecureConnection)
        {
            string url = "https://" + filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Url.Host + filterContext.HttpContext.Request.RawUrl;
            filterContext.Result = new RedirectResult(url, true);
        }
        #endif
    }
}

The reason Dulan's answer didn't work seems to be because the Permanent property of the filterContext.Result is readonly and can only be set when the RedirectResult() is called, and the problem is that RedirectResult() is called in the base.OnAuthorization() method. So just call the base method, then override the filterContext.Result below with the second parameter of true to make the result Permanent. After doing this, we began to see 301 codes in Fiddler2.

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Dulan's solution put me on the right path, but the code sample didn't stop the 302 redirect from the core RequireHttpsAttribute implementation. So, I looked up the code of RequireHttpsAttribute and hacked it. Here's what I came up with:

using System.Net;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using System;
using System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis;

[SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Performance", "CA1813:AvoidUnsealedAttributes", Justification = "Unsealed because type contains virtual extensibility points.")]
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = false)]
public class RequireHttps301Attribute : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter 
{

    public virtual void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext) 
    {
        if (filterContext == null) {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");
        }

        if (!filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsSecureConnection) {
            HandleNonHttpsRequest(filterContext);
        }
    }

    protected virtual void HandleNonHttpsRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext) 
    {
        // only redirect for GET requests, otherwise the browser might not propagate the verb and request
        // body correctly.

        if (!String.Equals(filterContext.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod, "GET", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Only redirect for GET requests, otherwise the browser might not propagate the verb and request body correctly.");
        }

        // redirect to HTTPS version of page
        string url = "https://" + filterContext.HttpContext.Request.Url.Host + filterContext.HttpContext.Request.RawUrl;
        //what mvc did to redirect as a 302 
        //filterContext.Result = new RedirectResult(url);

        //what I did to redirect as a 301
        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode =  (int)HttpStatusCode.MovedPermanently;
        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.RedirectLocation = url;
    }
}
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I believe with MVC 4+ you can use the RedirectResult constructor that takes 2 arguments and force a 301: filterContext.Result = new RedirectResult(url, true); –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 30 '13 at 13:24

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