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I call php from the commandline, with the -c argument to load another php.ini file, like this:

php -c my_ini_file.ini test.php

So in disabled_functions I added the echo function.

In test.php, echo works, and I don't know why. phpinfo() shows echo as a disabled function.

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1  
why would you even want to disable echo? –  Dagon Mar 8 '12 at 21:08
    
@Dagon: One reason I could think of would be if the script is executed by a Cron job, then anything that is echo'ed may get sent to postfix and start flooding emails or eating up disk space (if postfix isn't set up). That's something that happened to me, at least. –  Travesty3 Mar 8 '12 at 21:11
    
echo isn't even a function... –  powtac Mar 8 '12 at 21:14
    
@Travesty3 wouldn't writing the script correctly be a better option? This is like suppressing errors rather than fixing them –  Dagon Mar 8 '12 at 21:21
1  
@Travesty3: In that case, the answer is to redirect output via command-line, not to try and disable output commands of the script. –  webbiedave Mar 8 '12 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Echo is not a function, it is a built-in command. It cannot be disabled.

echo() is not actually a function (it is a language construct), so you are not required to use parentheses with it. echo() (unlike some other language constructs) does not behave like a function, so it cannot always be used in the context of a function. Additionally, if you want to pass more than one parameter to echo(), the parameters must not be enclosed within parentheses.

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According to the docs about echo

echo() is not actually a function (it is a language construct), so you are not required to use parentheses with it. echo() (unlike some other language constructs) does not behave like a function, so it cannot always be used in the context of a function. Additionally, if you want to pass more than one parameter to echo(), the parameters must not be enclosed within parentheses.

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As the other posters have already mentioned, echo is not really a function. Perhaps a solution for you would be to write another PHP script that includes the one you want to execute, but turns output buffering on and never outputs it. Something like:

<?php
    ob_start();
    include("test.php");
    ob_end_clean();
?>
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I was actually about to edit my answer to reflect your suggestion, you just beat me to it. This sounds like the correct way to avoid outputting content. –  Crashspeeder Mar 8 '12 at 21:08

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