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I'm stress testing an app by adding loads and loads of items and forcing it to do lots of work.

select *, (
    select price 
    from prices 
    WHERE widget_id = widget.id 
    ORDER BY id DESC
    LIMIT 1
    ) as maxprice
FROM widgets 
ORDER BY created_at DESC 
LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0
  • that query selects from widgets (approx 8500) and prices has 777000 or so entries in it.

The query is timing out on the test environment which is using the basic Heroku shared database. (193mb in use of the 5gig max.)

What will solve that time out issue? The prices update each hour, so every hour you get 8500x new rows.

It's hugely excessive amounts for the app (in reality it's unlikely it would ever have 8500 widgets) but I'm wondering what's appropriate to solve this?

Is my query stupid? (i.e. is it a bad style of query to do that subselect - my SQL knowledge is terrible, one of the goals of this project is to improve it!)

Or am I just hitting a limit of a shared db and should expect to move onto a dedicated db (e.g. the min $200 per month dedicated postgres instance from Heroku.) given the size of the prices table? Is there a deeper issue in terms of how I've designed the DB? (i.e. it's a one to many, one widget has many prices.) Is there a more sensible approach?

I'm totally new to the world of sql and queries etc. at scale, hence the utter ignorance expressed above. :)

share|improve this question
    
Is widget.id a primary key? If not do you have an index on it? And on widget_id? It looks like the prices are being updated. If that is the case update them in instead of inserting. Or do you need to keep the old prices? Also do not use select * as retrieving all columns can be expensive. Use explain to have an idea of what is most expensive inside the query. – Clodoaldo Neto Mar 8 '12 at 23:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Final version after comments below:

@Dave wants the latest price per widget. You could do that in sub-queries and LIMIT 1 per widget, but in modern PostgreSQL, a window function does the job more elegantly. Consider first_value() / last_value():

SELECT w.*
     , first_value(p.price) OVER (PARTITION BY w.id
                                  ORDER BY created_at DESC) AS latest_price
FROM (
    SELECT *
    FROM   widgets
    ORDER  BY created_at DESC
    LIMIT  20
    )  w
JOIN   prices p ON p.widget_id = w.id
GROUP  BY w.col1, w.col2 -- spell out all columns of w.*

Original post for the maximum price per widget:

SELECT w.*
     , max(p.price) AS max_price
FROM (
    SELECT *
    FROM   widgets
    ORDER  BY created_at DESC
    LIMIT  20
    )  w
JOIN   prices p ON p.widget_id = w.id
GROUP  BY w.col1, w.col2 -- spell out all columns of w.*
  • Fix table aliases.

  • Retrieve all columns of widgets like the question demonstrates

  • In PostgreSQL 8.3 you must spell out all non-aggregated columns of the SELECT list in the GROUP BY clause. In PostgreSQL 9.1 or later, the primary key column would cover the whole table. I quote the manual here:

Allow non-GROUP BY columns in the query target list when the primary key is specified in the GROUP BY clause

  • I advice to never use mixed case identifiers like maxWidgetPrice. Unquoted identifiers are folded to lower case by default in PostgreSQL. Do yourself a favor and use lower case identifiers exclusively.

  • Always use explicit JOIN conditions where possible. It's the canonical SQL way and it's more readable.

  • OFFSET 0 is just noise


Indexes:

However, the key to performance are the right indexes. I would go two indexes like these:

CREATE INDEX widgets_created_at_idx ON widgets (created_at DESC);
CREATE INDEX prices_widget_id_idx ON prices(widget_id, price DESC);

The second one is a multicolumn index, that should provide best performance for retrieving the maximum prize after you have determined the top 20 widgets using the first index. Not sure if PostgreSQL 8.3 (default on Heroku shared db) is already smart enough to make the most of it. PostgreSQL 9.1 certainly is.

For the latest price (see comments), use this index instead:

CREATE INDEX prices_widget_id_idx ON prices(widget_id, created_at DESC);

You don't have to (and shouldn't) just trust me. Test performance and query plans with EXPLAIN ANALYZE with and without indexes and see for yourself. Index creation should be very fast, even for a million rows.


If you consider to switch to a standalone PostgreSQL database on Heroku, you may be interested in this recent Heroku blog post:

  1. The default is now PostgreSQL 9.1.
  2. There you can cancel long running queries now.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed answer. I get 'column "w.id" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function', if I add w.id in a GROUP BY clause, it then asks me to add w.title to the GROUP BY clause, and so on until all widget columns are added. Then the query works! I've seen this group by requirement before and it's confusing me greatly. Is it something not needed in 9.1? – Dave Mar 8 '12 at 23:59
1  
@dave: Right, I forgot the GROUP BY clause. See amended answer. – Erwin Brandstetter Mar 9 '12 at 0:18
    
Thanks Erwin thats great. I just realised I need to amend this query - getting max(price) gets the maximum price from the prices table for the appropriate widget. Where what I actually need is the last price. Prices update on the hour via a process, so that's why I had order by created_at DESC limit 1 in my original query - but we're on the right track, looking forward to trying to hack this later. The prices are sort of share prices, so each widget has a share price that goes up and down over time, so the last share price is the most important as that is its current value. – Dave Mar 9 '12 at 10:55
1  
@Dave: I added a solution for the "latest price" per widget. – Erwin Brandstetter Mar 9 '12 at 17:48

I'm not quite clear on what you are asking, but here is my understanding:

Find the widgets you want to price. In this case it looks like you are looking for the most recent 20 widgets:

SELECT w.id
  FROM widgets
  ORDER BY created_at DESC
  LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0  

For each of the 20 widgets you found, it seems you want to find the highest associated price from the widget table:

SELECT s.id, MAX(p.price) AS maxWidgetPrice
  FROM (SELECT w.id
          FROM widgets
          ORDER BY created_at DESC
          LIMIT 20 OFFSET 0
        ) s -- widget subset
      , prices p
  WHERE s.id = p.widget_id
  GROUP BY s.id

prices.widget_id needs to be indexed for this to be effective. You don't want to process the entire prices table each time if it is relatively large, just the subset of rows you need. EDIT: added "group by" (and no, this was not tested)

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