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I've looked and found things about negative look ahead but I am still not sure what I should do for this. I have a RewriteRule ^([a-zA-Z0-9]+)/?$ which works fine except now I want it to exclude specifically the word "help" (only "help" and not "helper", "whelp", etc) and possibly a small number of other words in the future. and sorry, I know this has a lot of similar questions but I've not been able to figure out how to apply them to this specifically.

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What's the actual problem you're trying to solve? It's very likely that simply having a rewrite rule that takes higher precedence (i.e. is checked first) that accepts "help" and does whatever you want with it is the best solution here. –  Alexander Corwin Mar 8 '12 at 22:08
    
@AlexanderCorwin I have the "help rule at the top but when I click on a link that would take that rule it actually takes the very last RewriteRule I have, skipping some others as well. That doesn't happen with any others (they don't skip). RewriteRule ^/help/?$ help.php gets handled with RewriteRule ^([a-zA-Z0-9]+)/a/([^/]+)/([^/]+)/?$ page.php?var1=$1&var2=$2&var3=$3 EDIT- Nevermind. it was the first "/" I shouldnt have had that. –  qitch Mar 8 '12 at 22:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apache mod-rewrite should have a well-defined order of how it parses through the RewriteRules and which rule it will follow if there are conflicts.

Assuming it will follow the first matching rule, simply define the specific rules before the general one.

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I assumed that it did that but it didn't appear to work. I will look at it again. –  qitch Mar 8 '12 at 22:11
    
I was beginning it with a "/" and I shouldn't have. That is why it didn't work. –  qitch Mar 8 '12 at 22:21

Also, believe it or not, you could write a regex which matches all alphanumeric strings, except for "help". The regex ([a-zA-Z0-9]+)/?&~help can be rewritten to a regex which does not use the & and ~ (and and not) operators (not widely available).

The regex looks like dog's breakfast, and so you don't really want to do this. But here is how.

Firstly, all shorter alphanumeric codes are matched. "hel" is acceptable problem and neither is any other three-letter/digit sequence:

[a-zA-Z0-9]{1,3}

We can also recognize sequences of five or more characters; they are not "help" either, by including this:

[a-zA-Z0-9]{5,}

Now comes the tricky part, matching four-letter sequences which are not help. This means any four char identifier that doesn't begin with an h, or any four char that does not have e as the second letter. Etc:

[a-gi-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]{3}
[a-zA-Z0-9][a-df-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]{2}
[a-zA-Z0-9]{2}[a-km-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]
[a-zA-Z0-9]{3}[a-oq-zA-Z0-9]

The only four char pattern that does not match any one of these is the word "help". It doesn't match the first one because of the h, the second one because of the e, etc.

So, combining them all together with | and anchoring. Take a deep breath:

^([a-zA-Z0-9]{1,3}|[a-zA-Z0-9]{5,}|[a-gi-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]{3}|[a-zA-Z0-9][a-df-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]{2}|[a-zA-Z0-9]{2}[a-km-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]|[a-zA-Z0-9]{3}[a-oq-zA-Z0-9])$

This should be the new channel key for #unix on the EFNet IRC network. :)

Am I gonna test this? What are you nuts ...

Of course I did, but with sed. A little bit. Most of the meta chars have to be escaped, oops:

$ sed -n -e '/^\([a-zA-Z0-9]\{1,3\}\|[a-zA-Z0-9]\{5,\}\|[a-gi-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]\{3\}\|[a-zA-Z0-9][a-df-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]\{2\}\|[a-zA-Z0-9]\{2\}[a-km-zA-Z0-9][a-zA-Z0-9]\|[a-zA-Z0-9]\{3\}[a-oq-zA-Z0-9]\)$/p'
a  <- typed
a
aa  <- typed
aa
aaa  <-
aaa
aaaa   <-
aaaa
aaaaa  <-
aaaaa
help   <-  aha, no response from sed
aelp   <-
aelp
helper <-
helper
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P.S. I will have you know I wrote a regex implementation that supports ~, & and - (set difference) without backtracking. Not coming to Apache any time soon. :P –  Kaz Mar 9 '12 at 2:18

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