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I am developing a simple website and having a few issues with my CSS it looks fine in IE apart from the corner edges on my navigation tabs, I think this may not be supported by IE, however in Mozilla and Chrome it places my navigation bar on two lines it also changes the color of my h1 to black when its set to orange in CSS. Can you someone assist me with this, thanks.

body    {
background-color:#282828;
}

h1  {
text-align:center; 
color:#FFCC33;
}

#navbar {
    width:900px;

}

#navbar #holder     {   
        height: 64px; 
        border-bottom: 1px solid #FFCC33;
        width:880px;
        padding-left: 25px;
                }

#navbar #holder ul {    list-style: none; 
        margin:0;
        padding:0;
       }

#navbar #holder ul li a {   

        text-decoration: none;
        float:left;
        margin-right:10px; 
        font-family:"Arial Black", Gadget, sans-serif; 
        color: #FFCC33; 
        border: 1px solid #FFCC33; 
        border-bottom:none;
        padding:20px; 
        width :200px; 
        text-align:center; 
        display:block; 
        background:#282828;
        -moz-border-radius: 1em 4em 1em 4em;
        border-radius: 1em 4em 1em 4em;
        }

#navbar #holder ul li a:hover   {       

            background:#FFCC33; 
            color:#282828; 
            text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #FFCC33;
            }


#navbar #holder ul li   {
        display:inline;
            }


#holder ul li a#onlink  {
        background:#FFCC33;
        color:#282828;
        border-bottom:1px solid #FFCC33;
        }

#holder ul li a#onlink:hover    {
            background:#FFCC33;
            color:#003399;
            text-shadow:1px 1px 1px #000;
            }
share|improve this question
    
Does your <h1> have an id? Also, can you please include a jsFiddle? –  minitech Mar 8 '12 at 23:36
    
h1 has no id, never used jfiddle. –  mitchnufc Mar 8 '12 at 23:40
1  
Please either include a link to your page or a jsfiddle so we can see what else may be affecting your HTML besides the CSS you've copied here. thanks. edit - with jsfiddle you can copy all your css, html and javascript into the separate boxes, then hit "update" button, and then paste the link into your question, or a comment here. –  keithwyland Mar 8 '12 at 23:41
    
done, thanks jsfiddle.net/bcf2P –  mitchnufc Mar 8 '12 at 23:46
    
Your HTML is really badly invalid and you used an ID selector for the <h1>; that's why it wasn't orange. jsfiddle.net/bcf2P/2 –  minitech Mar 8 '12 at 23:51
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1 Answer

As minitech commented, the h1 was turning orange because you were using a # on the h1 selector when you really wanted to select just the h1 tag.

As for the nav wrapping onto two lines, it's because the total width of the <a> s inside your <li> s is more than the width you've given #holder. Padding is added onto the width of an element. So (200 + 20 + 20)*4 = 960, not 880. And don't forget margins and borders too. That's another 10px on the right in your case. Plus 1px on each side for border. So 1008px is the actual width of all those elements.

Another tip: use classes instead of ids for CSS styling. It's easy to run into the problem your HTML has of non-unique IDs. All IDs should be unique on a page, but you've got many id= onlink on your page. You can have lots of the same class name on one page with no problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I was going to up-vote your answer until I read the third paragraph. "always use ID's for JS and classes for styling", as some kind of a rule, is just too cumbersome to be practical. –  Sparky Mar 9 '12 at 0:22
    
Note that I said "for starting out" not "always". Thanks for the comment though, I could have been a little more clear and not given it as a rule of thumb when it's really just my initial thought process until i start throwing more than just basic CSS at stuff. I've edit the answer. –  keithwyland Mar 9 '12 at 0:26
    
Fair enough. But even for just starting out, I would not recommend such a practice. After all, I'm not going to create a new class when I want to style an element which already has an ID. And I'm certainly not going to create a bunch of new ID's when I want to target a class of elements using jQuery. When "starting out", it's better to start out with good habits as your core foundation because all habits tend to stick around way too long. –  Sparky Mar 9 '12 at 0:33
    
Thanks for the tips, I appreciate the help. Using classes makes sense! –  mitchnufc Mar 9 '12 at 0:38
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