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First look at this code:

class Program
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    var x =(Base) new Derived();
    ((IMethod)x).DoWork();

    Console.ReadKey();
  }
}

interface IMethod
{
  void DoWork();
}

abstract class Base : IMethod
{
  void IMethod.DoWork()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Base.DoWork");
  }
}

class Derived : Base, IMethod
{
  public void DoWork()
  {
    //here I where I want to call base.DoWork();
    Console.WriteLine("Derived.DoWork"); 
  }
}

Output:

Derived.DoWork

Desired:

Base.DoWork
Derived.DoWork

I'm dealing with an API that exposes an interface that when implemented, the DoWork method will be called at some part of the procession.

Now in the above example, the class Base is a part of the API, that internally (in the API) already explicitly implements that interface and does some important executions in the DoWork method.

I need to override the implementation of the IMethod in my derived class as well, so I get notified when needed, the problem is I can't 'override' the method and call the base method, neither can I cast base to IMethod.

Any solution?

Note: reflection won't work since it's a Silveright project, and private method invoking is prohibited.

share|improve this question
    
Why mix both styles of interface implementation? –  dkackman Mar 9 '12 at 1:36
2  
Your base class was apparently not designed with this kind of inheritance in mind; usually the base class would provide a protected virtual method implementing the logic of the explicit implementation if they expected to allow the behavior to be overridden. Given that, it's risky to 'force' this override behavior, even if you could find a way, as you're effectively deriving from the class in a way the original developer had not designed for. That said, it's still an interesting question. –  Dan Bryant Mar 9 '12 at 1:38
    
@DanBryant, let's put the design aside (there is no other choice than this), but don't forget that I need to implement the interface just as the base class does, and both methods have to be called. See my updated answer. –  Shimmy Mar 9 '12 at 3:22
    
@DanBryant, actually your solution is what I'm gonna do, I'll call a protected virtual method in the base and override it in derived. Please post as answer. –  Shimmy Mar 9 '12 at 3:30
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3 Answers

Are you able to just compose the classes, rather than using inheritance? Then you can implement DoWork() however you like, and still call DoWork() on the Base object as well. Since Base is abstract, you'll need to derive a dummy type to get everything to work.

class Derived : IMethod
{
    private class SneakyBase : Base
    {
        // abstract implementations here
    }

    private IMethod baseObject = new SneakyBase();

    void DoWork()
    {
        baseObject.DoWork();

        // Custom DoWork code here
    }
}

It's obviously a bit of pain to do things this way, but the API designers made an odd choice with the explicit interface implementation, and you're now paying for it.

share|improve this answer
    
Nah. The base class is abstract! Besides, in my scenario I do have to override it. –  Shimmy Mar 9 '12 at 1:32
    
@Shimmy See the edit. Sneakiness abounds! –  dlev Mar 9 '12 at 1:34
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Are you looking for:

public class Derived : Base
{
    public override void DoWork()
    {
        base.DoWork();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
That won't work; Base doesn't actually have a method called DoWork(). –  dlev Mar 9 '12 at 1:20
    
Ah, you're right. I didn't notice that it used the interface implementation. @Shimmy Is it possible to change the method's definition to not implement the interface explicitly (e.g., public virtual void DoWork())? –  pickypg Mar 9 '12 at 1:43
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've found DanBryant's comment to be the answer, although as he mentions is a bit risky since we can't assure the implementer will call the base method, but is a decent way tho.

I made a protected virtual method that is called from the private interface implementer, then, in the derived class, instead of worrying about the interface, I just care about overriding the base class and calling the base implementation from it, that works perfect, example:

abstract class Base : IMethod
{
  void IMethod.DoWork()
  {
    DoWork();
  }

  protected virtual void DoWork()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Base.DoWork");
  }
}

class Derived : Base
{
  protected override void DoWork()
  {
    base.DoWork();
    //here I where I want to call base.DoWork();
    Console.WriteLine("Derived.DoWork");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
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