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Can someone tell me why this code isn't producing what I want.

data BST = MakeNode BST String BST
           | Empty


add :: String -> BST -> BST
add new Empty = (MakeNode Empty new Empty)
add string tree@(MakeNode left value right)
    | string > value = MakeNode left value (add string right)
    | string < value = MakeNode (add string left) value right
    | otherwise = tree

output

 "John"
    "Doug"
        "Charlie"

"Alice"

listToBST :: [String] -> BST
listToBST = foldr add Empty
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What's wrong with it more precisely? It seems good to me. –  Riccardo Mar 9 '12 at 1:39
    
ill show you the output. –  user1204349 Mar 9 '12 at 1:44

2 Answers 2

If we create and function which takes a BST and returns a list in sorted order, modelled after sort . nub, then your Tree is fine as quickcheck tells us. QuickCheck is very easy to use.

import Data.List
import Test.QuickCheck

data BST = MakeNode BST String BST
       | Empty
deriving (Show)


add :: String -> BST -> BST
add new Empty = (MakeNode Empty new Empty)
add string tree@(MakeNode left value right)
    | string > value = MakeNode left value (add string right)
    | string < value = MakeNode (add string left) value right
    | otherwise = tree

test = ["alice", "blup", "test", "aa"]

manual_test = inorder (foldr add Empty test) == sort (nub test)
prop_inorder = property inorder_test 
    where inorder_test :: [String] -> Bool 
          inorder_test xs = inorder (foldr add Empty xs) == sort (nub xs)
-- return sorted nodes
inorder :: BST -> [String] 
inorder (Empty) = []
inorder (MakeNode l x r) = inorder l  ++ (x : inorder r)

Just load ghci and then run quickCheck prop_inorder.

Other useful functions are:

reverseOrder :: BST -> [String]
reverseOrder Empty = []
reverseOrder (MakeNode l x r) = reverseOrder r ++ (x : reverseOrder r)

asList :: BST -> [String]
asList Empty = []
asList (MakeNode l x r) = x : (asList l ++ asList r) 

And also think about making your tree more general by parameterizing over a:

data BST a = Empty | MakeNode (BST a) a (BST a)

You can make it than an instance of Functor, Monad, Foldable and all kind of handy typeclasses.

share|improve this answer

I tried it and it seems ok to me. It could help if you gave an example of an input that it doesn't work for.

I think the problem may be that string comparison does not work the way you expect ("123" < "7" because "1" < "7"). If I'm right, you might want to use Ints instead of Strings or even better, the class Ord of all the types that can be ordered using (<).

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okay, thanks alot. –  user1204349 Mar 9 '12 at 1:58
    
i was thinking I should make a function to test if a tree is legal or not. how would I go about that? –  user1204349 Mar 9 '12 at 2:17
    
You would write the invariant that defines a legal vs illegal tree and run it as a binary test... preferably making it a quickcheck property. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Mar 9 '12 at 6:25
    
I think Thomas' suggestion is ok, but the quickcheck part is too much imho. Use a plain recursive function. Think what the property is for a node and apply it recursively to every node, from top to bottom (from root to leaves). –  Ivan Perez Mar 9 '12 at 16:09

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