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How to get the complete list of deleted files if user delete the a root folder:

Ex: c:\A\B\C\D\F\read.txt

If user delete the root folder A, I need to get the files/folders realted to A, Is there any API in C# for this?

Can we get use the root folder path and retrieve the related files from teh RecycleBin? I dont't know if user clicks Shift + Delete, how we can get it from RecyleBIn

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

No there isn't an API that will tell you which files have been deleted. You could list the contents of the Recycle Bin but it is not guaranteed to be accurate (because of the reason you describe in your question: Shift+Delete).

Short of maintaining a list of existing files at any point in time or monitoring disk changes with FileSystemWatcher (or possibly an OS filter driver), I think you're out of luck.

I am curious though, why would you want to?

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The actual issue is FileSystemWatcher has an issue, if I delete a Nested File b(c:\b\c\d), Filewatcher generates only one event for the root B, but if I delete shift + delete, Filewacther genearates events for all sub folder and files, –  HPFE455 Mar 9 '12 at 2:34
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@HPFE455 The reason is because SHIFT + DEL actually does a file system deletion. When you just use DEL it's a file system move to the Recycle Bin. –  Yuck Mar 9 '12 at 2:41
    
@Yuck - I didn't test it but that actually make sense. I learned (another) something today :) –  M.Babcock Mar 9 '12 at 2:44
    
is there any way to do both Del and shift + del in a similar way.. I need to get all events –  HPFE455 Mar 9 '12 at 2:45
    
@HPFE455 - It isn't the same action so why would you expect them both to be treated the same? They actually mean 2 different things. –  M.Babcock Mar 9 '12 at 2:46

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