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Creating a link in PHP:

echo "<a href=\"$currentFile?rowID=$row['id']\">click here</a>";

This throws an error: Parse error: parse error, expecting 'T_STRING' or 'T_VARIABLE' or 'T_NUM_STRING'. How can you do this?

Also, mixing single and double quotes, and escaping double quotes reduces readability and always generates errors. Is there a better way to create quotes with another syntax, like %Q() in Ruby?

Working PHP 5.2.8.

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it's not required, but this is how I prefer to do what you're doing: echo '<a href="'.$currentFile.'?rowID='.$row['id'].'">click here</a>'; –  Shea Mar 9 '12 at 2:27
    
Agreed, this way it is clearer by delimiting strings from variables. –  Manhim Mar 9 '12 at 2:31
    
@andrewjackson - I've done it that way too, but I find it difficult to read and error prone. –  B Seven Mar 9 '12 at 2:31
    
@BSeven Jw, but are you using a code editor with syntax highlighting? –  Shea Mar 9 '12 at 2:32
    
@andrewjackson - Yes, Dreamweaver. –  B Seven Mar 9 '12 at 2:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is your array variable interpolation. The syntax is either

"$row[id]"

or

"{$row['id']}"

So:

"<a href=\"$currentFile?rowID=$row[id]\">click here</a>"

See http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php#language.types.string.parsing.

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+1 good answer. –  Shea Mar 9 '12 at 2:34

sprintf is your friend for complex strings with variables:

http://php.net/manual/en/function.sprintf.php

echo sprintf('<a href="%s?rowID=%d">click here</a>', $currentFile, $row['id']);

Here I assume that $currentFile is a string (you could further manipulate the string, perhaps with urlencode) and $row['id'] is an integer.

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If quotes get confusing, which they can, try heredoc syntax:

echo <<< END_HTML
    <a href="$currentFile?rowID=$row[id]">click here</a>
END_HTML;

...just make sure that the END_HTML; is on a line by itself, with no indentation and no trailing whitespace. Here, heredoc is overkill. But for larger HTML blocks with lots of variables it can be much easier than escaping quotes everywhere.

PHP heredoc

Cheers

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Enclose the variables in {} like this {$currentFile} and {$row['id']}.

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for named arrays inside of double quotes, you should not use single quotes:

echo "<a href=\"$currentFile?rowID=$row[id]\">click here</a>";
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I suggest you to echo HTML-Code in single quotes and their tags in double quotes for the reason of clarity. When someone else looks over your code a ton of escaped quotes makes it just look complicated.

e.g

echo '<a id="testlink" alt="blabla" href="test.php?somevar='.$xy.'">Test</a>';
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