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The Case

I have two floating divs next to each other. Both have "fluid" contents and I want them to stay next to each other unless they touch. Then, I want them to be stacked.

The problem is that my fluid content (like text or a list) crumbles in IE 7 as soon as the two divs touch. On top of that, this only happens with some IE 7 versions, not all.


The Code

<div class="left-aligned">
    <p>This is some text of undetermined length.</p>
</div>
<div class="right-aligned">
    <p>This is some text of undetermined length as well.</p>
</div>

.left-aligned {
   float: left;
}

.right-aligned {
   float: right;
}


The Test

  1. Case 1
  2. Case 2


The Problem

So,apparently, this issue only happens with IE7 and appears to be random. Some people see the wrong layout, some the correct one. Anyone who can shed a light?

share|improve this question
    
Case 3 is not happening for me on IE either? Is it IE6? –  Paolo Bergantino Jun 7 '09 at 21:21
    
Both IE 6 and 7 fail. –  Kriem Jun 7 '09 at 21:22
    
Are you testing your own page or the example I posted? Do you have a proper DOCTYPEs? On IE7, Windows XP for me the Case 2 link looks identical in FF and IE. –  Paolo Bergantino Jun 7 '09 at 21:24
1  
tested on 3rd computer, showing wrong layout... :? –  Paolo Bergantino Jun 7 '09 at 21:40
1  
Not random, no. I'm sure there's a common denominator somewhere. I just have to think about it some. –  Paolo Bergantino Jun 7 '09 at 21:52

3 Answers 3

Unless I misunderstood, this is easily done by floating the 1st div to the left and 2nd div to the right.

Here is an example of Case 1.

Here is an example of Case 2.

I wrapped them in a <div> of fixed width in the example to more easily illustrate the behavior, but without it the same effect would happen just relative to the viewport.

share|improve this answer
    
Your example is exactly what I want to achieve. It appears that this is an IE issue. :( –  Kriem Jun 7 '09 at 21:18
    
To be clear: These examples have now been put into the question. They should behave correctly, but don't always. IE 7 seems to be occasionally reluctant. –  Kriem Jun 8 '09 at 12:36

Add css:

.left-aligned {
   float: left;
}

.right-aligned {
   float: right;
}

Unless I'm missing something, this should give you exactly the behaviour you are looking for.

share|improve this answer

The CSS2 specifications state "A floated box must have an explicit width". See the float section (9.5) in Visual Formatting Model. If no width is set, the results can be unpredictable.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. So, how would you suggest creating the effect I want without explicitly defining a width? The contents are of an undetermined length. There's no way to know. Any thoughts? –  Kriem Jun 10 '09 at 15:31
    
I don't think there is any way with just css. You may be able to use javascript to monitor the width of the left and right sides and put a width on the right float if left width + (unfloated) right width > 100% –  Emily Jun 10 '09 at 17:23

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