Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
def fib(n):
    if n == 1:
        return 0
    if n == 2:
        return 1
    return fib(n-2) + fib(n-1)


def memo(f):
    cache = {}
    def memoized(n):
        if n not in cache:
            cache[n] = f(n)
        return cache[n]
    return memoized

fib1 = memo(fib)

This code runs really slow on my laptop, but if I change the name fib1 to fib, then everything works fine...anyone know the reason ? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Add some prints to your fib() function and see if the calls make sense to you. –  Russell Borogove Mar 9 '12 at 2:35
    
A nice way to do this is with decorators: ujihisa.blogspot.com/2010/11/… –  Hooked Mar 9 '12 at 2:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

fib recurses into fib, not fib1. If the memoized version has a different name it won't get used.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh yes, I see the problem :) –  Ang Mar 9 '12 at 2:48

In that code fib is the name of the non-memoized function. fib1 is the name you've given to the memoized function. But if you see your code, you'll see that it recursively calls fib the non-memoized version. Hence why you aren't getting a speed advantage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Winston! –  Ang Mar 9 '12 at 2:48

I agree that adding some prints you would probably see the issue. You're very close to actually getting it.

What you have right now only stores n where n is the argument given to fib1. Inside fib, you're calling fib which won't memoize any previously computed values. So by adding a print statement to fib print "fib ", n and calling fib1(4), you will get the following output:

fib 4
fib 2
fib 3
fib 1
fib 2

So you see it calls fib with n=2 twice. The reason why fib = memo(fib) is faster is because then it's actually momoizing because you're redefining fib to be the memoized function.

share|improve this answer

In python 3 you can achieve your goal by using nonlocal as pointed out here.

def memo(f):
    cache = {}
    def memoized(n):
        nonlocal cache
        if n not in cache:
            cache[n] = f(n)
        return cache[n]
    return memoized

Python's functools module provides decorators that accomplish caching. There is a limit to these approaches in that they add cost to the total recursion depth. An alternate approach using closures allows for deeper recursion.

def fibonacci(n):
    cache = {0:0,1:1}
    def fib(n):
        if n in cache:
            return cache[n]
        cache[n] = fib(n-1) + fib(n-2)
        return cache[n]
    return fib(n)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.