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Suppose I have a table that looks like the following

id | location | dateHired | dateRehired | dateTerminated
1  | 1        | 10/1/2011 | NULL        | 12/1/2011
2  | 1        | 10/3/2011 | 11/1/2011   | 12/31/2011
3  | 5        | 10/5/2011 | NULL        | NULL
4  | 5        | 10/5/2011 | NULL        | NULL
5  | 7        | 11/5/2011 | NULL        | 12/1/2011
6  | 10       | 11/2/2011 | NULL        | NULL

and I wanted to condense that into a summary table such that:

location | date        | hires  | rehires |   terms
1        |  10/1/2011  |   1    |    0    |     0
1        |  10/3/2011  |   1    |    0    |     0
1        |  11/1/2011  |   0    |    1    |     0
1        |  12/1/2011  |   0    |    0    |     1
1        |  12/31/2011 |   1    |    0    |     0
5        |  10/5/2011  |   2    |    0    |     0

etc.

-- what would that SQL look like? I was thinking it would be something to the effect of:

SELECT
  e.location
  , -- ?
  ,SUM(CASE WHEN e.dateHired IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS Hires
  ,SUM(CASE WHEN e.dateRehired IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) As Rehires
  ,SUM(CASE WHEN e.dateTerminated IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) As Terms
FROM
  Employment e
GROUP BY
  e.Location
  ,--?

But I'm not real keen if that's entirely correct or not?

EDIT - This is for SQL 2008 R2.

Also,

INNER JOIN on the date columns assumes that there are values for all three categories, which is false; which is the original problem I was trying to solve. I was thinking something like COALESCE, but that doesn't really make sense either.

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2  
It might help to mention which RDBMS you're using. –  Marc Mar 9 '12 at 3:10
    
Rather than using CASE in line, try using the function ISNULL() also, try using COUNT rather than SUM. I'm assuming SQL Server. –  Robert Kaucher Mar 9 '12 at 3:14
    
Correct, SQL Server. My fault. –  Randster Mar 9 '12 at 3:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am sure there is probably an easier, more elegant way to solve this. However, this is the simplest, quickest that I can think of this late that works.

CREATE TABLE #Temp
(
    Location INT,
    Date DATETIME,
    HireCount INT,
    RehireCount INT,
    DateTerminatedCount INT
)

--This will keep us from having to do an insert if does not already exist
INSERT INTO #Temp (Location, Date)
SELECT DISTINCT Location, DateHired FROM Employment
UNION
SELECT DISTINCT Location, DateRehired FROM Employment
UNION
SELECT DISTINCT Location, DateTerminated FROM Employment

UPDATE #Temp
SET HireCount = Hired.HireCount
FROM #Temp
JOIN
(
    SELECT Location, DateHired AS Date, SUM(*) AS HireCount 
    FROM Employment
    GROUP BY Location, DateHired
) AS Hired

UPDATE #Temp
SET RehireCount= Rehire.RehireCount
FROM #Temp
JOIN
(
    SELECT Location, DateRehired AS Date, SUM(*) AS RehireCount
    FROM Employment
    GROUP BY Location, DateRehired
) AS Rehire
    ON Rehire.Location = #Temp.Location AND Rehire.Date = #Temp.Date

UPDATE #Temp
SET DateTerminatedCount = Terminated.DateTerminatedCount
FROM #Temp
JOIN
(
    SELECT Location, DateTerminated AS Date, SUM(*) AS DateTerminatedCount
    FROM Employment
    GROUP BY Location, DateTerminated
) AS Terminated
    ON Terminated.Location = #Temp.Location AND Terminated.Date = #Temp.Date

SELECT * FROM #Temp
share|improve this answer
    
JOIN'ing on DATE assumes that there are values for all three metrics, which is incorrect. It was the same trap that I fell into earlier this evening, which is why I went to SO with the question. –  Randster Mar 9 '12 at 3:37
    
You are right, so the simplest solution I can think of is in my new updated code. Very crude, but it should work –  Justin Pihony Mar 9 '12 at 3:49
    
There we go. Thank you so much. I was so intent on thinking that I could get it done with just one SELECT and some JOIN madness. You've saved me much trouble. Thanks again. –  Randster Mar 9 '12 at 4:21
    
Yah, when there are too many variations, especially in groups, then you know it is time to break it up. Glad to help :) –  Justin Pihony Mar 9 '12 at 5:07

How about something like:

with dates as (
    select distinct location, d from (
        select location, dateHired as [d]
        from tbl
        where dateHired is not null

        union all

        select location, dateRehired 
        from tbl
        where dateRehired is not null

        union all  

        select location, dateTerminated
        from tbl
        where dateTerminated is not null
    )
)

select location, [d],
    (
        select count(*) 
        from tbl 
        where location = dates.location 
            and dateHired = dates.[d]
    ) as hires,
    (
        select count(*) 
        from tbl 
        where location = dates.location 
            and dateRehired = dates.[d]
    ) as rehires,
    (
        select count(*) 
        from tbl 
        where location = dates.location 
            and dateTerminated = dates.[d]
    ) as terms
from dates

I don't have a SQL server handy, or I'd test it out.

share|improve this answer
    
CTEs would work as well I suppose. –  Randster Mar 9 '12 at 4:43
    
Yah, a CTE just pretties it up. Also, you will want a UNION, not a UNION ALL. Since you only want one row for each date/location combo. –  Justin Pihony Mar 9 '12 at 5:06
    
@JustinPihony: Alas, no. I made a conscious decision to use union all here because I want the unique combinations from the entire set, so rather than use union and figure out distinctness as the operation progresses, I threw the distinct at the top. –  Ben Thul Mar 9 '12 at 14:03
    
@Randster: I invite you to check the performance of both results and also to compare execution plans. –  Ben Thul Mar 9 '12 at 14:04
SELECT * FROM  
(SELECT location, dateHired as date, COUNT(1) as hires FROM mytable GROUP BY location, date) H  
INNER JOIN  
(SELECT location, dateReHired as date, COUNT(1) as rehires FROM mytable GROUP BY location, date) R ON H.location = R.location AND H.dateHired = R.dateRehired  
INNER JOIN 
(SELECT location, dateTerminated as date, COUNT(1) as terminated FROM mytable GROUP BY  location, date) T  
ON H.location = T.location AND H.dateHired = T.dateTerminated
share|improve this answer
    
added code formatting - simple (this username makes my comments sound wierd) - add 2 spaces at the end of lines and they will line break :) –  Michael Durrant Mar 9 '12 at 3:13
    
Streams of consciousness don't generally get upvoted. –  OMG Ponies Mar 9 '12 at 3:13
    
This will not work as you wrote it because you are renaming your dates to date and then joining on the original name. Also, when writing code, please try to make it not all on one line for readability –  Justin Pihony Mar 9 '12 at 3:14
    
yeah musta been wrong keyboard row. Easy there. –  Michael Durrant Mar 9 '12 at 3:15
    
reload please folks. –  Michael Durrant Mar 9 '12 at 3:15

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