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Is it possible to format a float in C to only show up to 2 decimal places if different from 0s using printf?

Ex:

12 => 12

12.1 => 12.1

12.12 => 12.12

I tried using:

float f = 12;
printf("%.2f", f)

but I get

12 => 12.00

12.1 => 12.10

12.12 => 12.12

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1  
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/277772/… –  Mike Kwan Mar 9 '12 at 3:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You can use the %g format specifier:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  float f1 = 12;
  float f2 = 12.1;
  float f3 = 12.12;
  float f4 = 12.1234;
  printf("%g\n", f1);
  printf("%g\n", f2);
  printf("%g\n", f3);
  printf("%g\n", f4);
  return 0;
}

Result:

12
12.1
12.12
12.1234

Note that, unlike the f format specifier, if you specify a number before the g it refers to the length of the entire number (not the number of decimal places as with f).

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1  
you still want to have the %.2g so that it limits to 2 decimal places. –  twain249 Mar 9 '12 at 4:00
2  
By the way, for the f format specifier the number represents decimal digits, but for g it is the total length of the number. –  bernie Mar 9 '12 at 4:11
1  
wow that seems like a complicated why of doing it. I was thinking something like sprintf(temp, "%f", f); temp2 = strchr(temp, '.'); i = temp2-temp; printf(%.*g\n", (i+2), f); but I don't know if that will actually work. I think I'll go try it. –  twain249 Mar 9 '12 at 4:22
1  
Worked for me. obviously you have to define all the variables correctly. –  twain249 Mar 9 '12 at 4:30
5  
What is unfortunately not good about %g, is that it may truncate number and you will lose precision, for example printf("%g", 1363262708.988428) will give you 1.36326e+09, however with %f it will print correctly (exactly 1363262708.988428). –  ivanzoid Mar 14 '13 at 12:23

From our discussion in the above answer here is my program that works for any number of digits before the decimal.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main() {
    float f1 = 12.13;
    float f2 = 12.245;
    float f3 = 1242.145;
    float f4 = 1214.1;

    int i = 0;
    char *s1 = (char *)(malloc(sizeof(char) * 20));
    char *s2 = (char *)(malloc(sizeof(char) * 20));

    sprintf(s1, "%f", f1);
    s2 = strchr(s1, '.');
    i = s2 - s1;
    printf("%.*g\n", (i+2), f1);

    sprintf(s1, "%f", f2);
    s2 = strchr(s1, '.');
    i = s2 - s1;
    printf("%.*g\n", (i+2), f2);

    sprintf(s1, "%f", f3);
    s2 = strchr(s1, '.');
    i = s2 - s1;
    printf("%.*g\n", (i+2), f3);

    sprintf(s1, "%f", f4);
    s2 = strchr(s1, '.');
    i = s2 - s1;
    printf("%.*g\n", (i+2), f4);

    free(s1);
    free(s2);

    return 0;
}

And here's the output

12.13
12.24
1242.15
1214.1
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For what it's worth, here's a simple ObjC implementation:

// Usage for Output   1 — 1.23
[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ — %@", [self stringWithFloat:1], 
                                       [self stringWithFloat:1.234];

// Checks if it's an int and if not displays 2 decimals.
+ (NSString*)stringWithFloat:(CGFloat)_float
{
    NSString *format = (NSInteger)_float == _float ? @"%.0f" : @"%.2f";
    return [NSString stringWithFormat:format, _float];
}

%g wasn't doing it for me — this one yes :-) Hope it's useful to some of you.

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