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I am trying to establish a barrier between to different processes in Windows. They are essentially two copies of the same process (Running them as two separate threads instead of processes is not an option). The idea is to place barriers at different stages of the program, to make sure that both processes start each stage at the same time. What is the most efficient way of implementing this in Windows?

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Use named event (see CreateEvent and WaitForSingleObject API functions). You would need two events per barrier - each event created in another instance of the application. Then both instances wait for each other's event. Of course these events can be reused later for another barrier.

There's one complexity though - as event names are globally unique (let's say so for simplicity), each event would have a different name, maybe prefixed by instance process ID. So each instance of the application would have to get another instance's ID in order to find the name of the event created by another instance.

If you have windowed application, you can broadcast a message which will inform second instance of the application about existence of the first instance.

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Thanks. That makes sense. I guess since I am just using two processes I can just use any IPC method to send the instance process id. I am curious, as how would you broadcast a message as you mention if I had a variable number of instances? –  cloudraven Mar 9 '12 at 16:33
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@cloudraven Quick and dirty method is to make use of BroadcastSystemMessage (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…) . Correct way is to enumerate windows (EnumWindows(), if memory serves) and send your message to each window. –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Mar 9 '12 at 16:37

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